BYU Speeches https://speeches.byu.edu Wed, 25 Apr 2018 20:42:20 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.9.5 https://speeches.byu.edu/wp-content/uploads/ico/favicon.png BYU Speeches https://speeches.byu.edu 32 32 BYU Speeches clean BYU Speeches pgtech@byu.edu pgtech@byu.edu (BYU Speeches) pgtech@byu.edu Devotionals delivered at BYU. A Holier Approach to Ministering https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/neil-l-andersen_a-holier-approach-to-ministering/ Tue, 10 Apr 2018 14:47:51 +0000 https://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=15469 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/neil-l-andersen_a-holier-approach-to-ministering/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/neil-l-andersen_a-holier-approach-to-ministering/feed/ 0 <p>The text for this devotional is forthcoming.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/neil-l-andersen_a-holier-approach-to-ministering/">A Holier Approach to Ministering</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Neil L. Andersen, 10 April 2018 Neil L. Andersen, 10 April 2018 Neil L. Andersen clean 30:25 Seeing Things Differently https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/michael-j-dorff_seeing-things-differently/ Tue, 03 Apr 2018 21:21:26 +0000 https://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=15393 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/michael-j-dorff_seeing-things-differently/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/michael-j-dorff_seeing-things-differently/feed/ 0 <p>I have a confession. I have been wondering whether I should admit this to such a large crowd, but here we go. My confession is that I love mathematics! I know that for some of you, the word math brings a flood of bad memories. So before people get up to leave, let me share with you a different way to see math. Seeing Beauty Unfortunately, many people have the mistaken idea that math is just a set of rules and calculations. That is not mathematics. My family and I love the NCAA March Madness basketball tournament. Sitting around with friends and watching an underdog team beat a highly favored team with a last-second desperation shot is exciting. Compare such a thrilling basketball game to being alone in a gym shooting hundreds and hundreds of free throws. If all I ever did were to shoot free throws over and over all by myself and never play or watch a real game of basketball, I wouldn’t like basketball. The same is true with math. Doing endless math drills is like shooting free throws over and over. It is not mathematics. To me, math can be like a game of strategy, such as The Settlers of Catan. Once you know the rules of the game, you can explore where the game can take you. In some ways math is like genealogy. You have several family lines to work on, and you may get stuck. But then a new piece of information opens up a previously blocked family line. You get excited and new results are uncovered. The same happens with mathematics. You could be working at the Disney Research Group using math to create realistic-looking hair in the movie Moana, you could be designing a new method for Netflix to determine what movies a subscriber would like, or you could even be working on an abstract math problem that uncovers new results, such as finding a fast algorithm to determine whether or not a number is prime. That is how I see math and why I love it. To me, mathematics is beautiful. Now, the world has many beautiful things. Watching a rising full moon peek over the Wasatch Mountains on a dark winter night, sitting outside on a New Hampshire fall evening while savoring poetry by Robert Frost, listening to the Vienna Philharmonic perform Beethoven’s Symphony no. 9 in D Minor in the 150-year-old neoclassical Wiener Musikverein concert hall—all of these things are beautiful to me. Likewise, mathematics is beautiful. Some of you may think I am crazy. Remember, when I think of math, I am not talking about the endless drills that you probably did in high school. When people ask me what research I do, I say that I study the math of soap bubbles. These bubbles are actually soap films that are formed by dipping wires or frames into a bucket of soapy water. To me, these soap films are fascinating—the shapes they take, the way they reflect light, their […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/michael-j-dorff_seeing-things-differently/">Seeing Things Differently</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Michael J. Dorff, 3 April 2018 Michael J. Dorff, 3 April 2018 Michael J. Dorff clean 25:46 Embrace the Plan https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/kim-b-clark_embrace-the-plan/ Tue, 20 Mar 2018 17:03:22 +0000 https://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=15245 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/kim-b-clark_embrace-the-plan/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/kim-b-clark_embrace-the-plan/feed/ 0 <p>Brothers and sisters, it is a joy to be with you today. I love you, and I love this university. I remember what it felt like to be a student. I remember the stress of papers and exams and the worry and the uncertainty about the future. But I also remember the sense of possibilities and opportunities ahead and the feelings of hope and faith in the Savior. Now, looking back on those years, I can see that the Lord Jesus Christ was way ahead of me, working in my life and preparing the way before me. I want each of you to know that He is working in your life right now and preparing the way before you. It is all part of Heavenly Father’s plan. That is what I want to talk about today. My message is a simple invitation: embrace the plan! I will begin with a story that I hope will help you begin to understand what that invitation means. Almost twenty years ago I was diagnosed with chronic kidney disease. My kidney doctor told me that in ten to twelve years I would need to go on dialysis or have a transplant. In my mind I said to myself, “No, I won’t. I will be disciplined and diligent, and the Lord will bless me. I will die of something else.” That was my plan. And for several years it worked pretty well. But then my kidneys began to fail. My doctor told me I needed to prepare for a transplant. With my plan not working, I went to my Heavenly Father in prayer and asked Him for His help and His guidance. I received a very clear impression: my plan was not His plan. His plan had a transplant in it, and I needed to get ready. So I sent out a simple message to my children and my siblings: “I need a transplant. If any of you would like to give me a kidney, please call this number.” On August 2, 2011, my son Andrew gave me a kidney. As I prepared for the operation, I felt impressed to embrace Heavenly Father’s plan—every bit of it. Here is an example: Every night that I was in the hospital, the nurses woke me several times to give me a shot, check my fluids and my vital signs, weigh me, or give me medicine. Every time they woke me up, I said to them, “I am so happy to see you.” Those nurses helped give me new life. That was the plan, and I embraced it. My dear brothers and sisters, with all my heart I invite you to follow Jesus Christ and embrace Heavenly Father’s great plan of salvation. I use the word embrace because I want you to accept the plan gladly and eagerly—to adopt it into your life fully and completely.1 I want you to put your arms around the plan and draw it in close to your heart with love and gratitude […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/kim-b-clark_embrace-the-plan/">Embrace the Plan</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Brothers and sisters, it is a joy to be with you today. I love you, and I love this university. I remember what it felt like to be a student. I remember the stress of papers and exams and the worry and the uncertainty about the future. Kim B. Clark, 20 March 2018 Kim B. Clark clean 31:33 Kim B. Clark, 20 March 2018 Integrity of Heart https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/ronald-a-rasband_integrity-of-the-heart/ Tue, 13 Mar 2018 21:10:40 +0000 https://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=15187 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/ronald-a-rasband_integrity-of-the-heart/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/ronald-a-rasband_integrity-of-the-heart/feed/ 0 <p>Good morning, my dear brothers and sisters. I am grateful to be here with Sister Rasband and members of my family. I also want to recognize members of the Jon and Karen Huntsman family who are here as my special guests today. I am honored to be here with President Kevin J Worthen and other administrators, faculty, and staff and, most of all, with you, the students of Brigham Young University. When I visit this campus, I am impressed that you are following your dreams of education and opportunity and are living the standards of the Church. The Lord has special plans for you to lead in a world that needs your goodness, your service to others, your educated minds, and your spirituality born of testimonies of Jesus Christ. A Man of Great Integrity When I was nearing the end of my college studies in marketing and business at a school to the north, I had an experience that shaped my direction: by divine design, I met Jon Huntsman. He was a giant of a man by every standard—a businessman, philanthropist, Church leader, faithful husband, father of nine, visionary, and loyal, beloved friend of mine. As you may know, Jon passed away recently. In tribute, the First Presidency said of him, “We honor Jon as a cherished husband, father and friend, esteemed as a leader for his exceptional capacity, commitment, philanthropy and service throughout the world.”1 Jon said of himself: I made it to where I am today because of a solid faith in God and myself and with the unwavering support of my wife, Karen, and nine children. I made it because I come from good stock, a healthy ancestral mix of preachers and saloonkeepers who provided potent DNA for embracing values and accepting others who may not think the same as you do. This nation provides incredible opportunities, especially for those who are focused, tenacious, and willing to take risks.2 His passing has caused me to reflect on his tremendous influence in my life. Jon’s story is one of rags to riches. He grew up in Idaho; he was poor. His father was a school teacher. Jon got a scholarship to the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, where he struggled his first two years, not taking his education seriously. Some of you may be in that pit! When his father suggested he attend a school with an easier curriculum, he realized he was squandering the opportunity he had been given. He spent the next two years seriously studying and significantly surpassing his former performance. He graduated from Wharton with honors. Later he served in the United States Navy, worked as a special assistant to the president of the United States, and began his professional career at an egg-producing company, where an idea for better packaging launched his multimillion-dollar empire. Jon built a company from scratch that resulted in 15,000 employees and many plants around the world. He was always running for a plane, meeting with dignitaries and […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/ronald-a-rasband_integrity-of-the-heart/">Integrity of Heart</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Ronald A. Rasband, 13 March 2018 Ronald A. Rasband, 13 March 2018 Ronald A. Rasband clean 27:32 Discovering Your Divine Individuality https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/julie-crockett_discovering-divine-individuality/ Tue, 06 Mar 2018 23:08:14 +0000 http://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=15145 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/julie-crockett_discovering-divine-individuality/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/julie-crockett_discovering-divine-individuality/feed/ 0 <p>I am so excited to be here speaking to all of you. I know it might make me seem a little weird that I want to speak in front of thousands of ­people, but that is okay. I know I am a little weird. All my life I have enjoyed being an individual who is different from those around me. I am over six feet tall, but I still wear heels so I can be even taller. As a volleyball player, on long flights to away games I would sit cramped in my seat doing my calculus homework while my teammates teased me for being a nerd. I still find “your mom” jokes hilarious and will laugh loud enough that someone a mile away can hear. I don’t know anyone exactly like me, and I truly enjoy it. Some of you may be thinking, “She is crazy! Who wants to stick out all the time? Isn’t it nice to just fit in sometimes?” Whether you want to be different or you feel you are too different, it is okay. We are supposed to be different. We were different individuals in the pre-earth life, and we will continue to be different in the next life. This was important knowledge for me to gain because as I think about working toward perfection—a common goal for many of us—I worry I may lose some of my personality traits that allow me to be me. If we are all perfect, kind, faithful, obedient, and knowledgeable, will we all be the same? It would be kind of like Syndrome’s statement in The Incredibles when he says he will sell his inventions so everyone can be superheroes: “And when everyone’s super, no one will be” (IMDb’s pages for quotes for The Incredibles [2004], imdb.com/title/tt0317705/quotes). Now I don’t fear that all of us will become ­perfect in this life—of course none of us will be perfect in a lifetime. But as I continue to work toward this common goal, I want to keep my sense of self. How can I keep my individuality while striving for perfection? I will work to answer the following questions and discuss several examples. First, what defines our individuality and why is individuality important? Second, what is perfection and what attributes define it? Do we have to be the same to be perfect, or can we be different? Third, I will give some examples of a group of individuals who represent both perfection and individuality. Fourth, I will focus on us—where we are and where we go from here. How do we learn to love and strengthen our individual attributes and become like Christ? The Blessings of Individuality First, what defines our individuality and why is it important? One of the ways we are individuals is through our gifts—those things that come easily to us. Our innate capabilities help define who we are and are often related to those things we are naturally inclined to enjoy. In addition, we all have different experiences in […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/julie-crockett_discovering-divine-individuality/">Discovering Your Divine Individuality</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Julie Crockett, 6 March 2018 Julie Crockett, 6 March 2018 Julie Crockett clean 26:16 Rise and Shout and Shine Forth! https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/s-gifford-nielsen_rise-shout-shine-forth/ Tue, 27 Feb 2018 20:43:57 +0000 http://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=15093 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/s-gifford-nielsen_rise-shout-shine-forth/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/s-gifford-nielsen_rise-shout-shine-forth/feed/ 0 <p>I pray that the Spirit will be with us to prompt our thinking as we join together today. It is an honor for me to be with you. Having my nephew Mike play the organ and my grandchildren Ashlyn and Drew give the prayers just adds to the joy. Looking on the Bright Side Our son shared a story told to him by a teacher at BYU recounting a family’s experience while hosting an apostle in their home during a stake conference weekend. The mother was anxious to prepare things as perfectly as possible for their respected visitor, yet she found it challenging to keep the house clean while her rambunctious young boys ran and played from room to room. In an act of desperation, after carefully cleaning the guest bathroom, she pinned a note to the towels that read, “Touch these—you die!” The note did the trick, because when the guest arrived, the house looked tidy and all went well. After the apostle left, the weary hostess was just about to sit down to relax when she had a horrifying thought: “Did anyone ever take the note off the towels?” Running to the guest bathroom, she was mortified at what she saw. The note was still in place and the bath towels were clean and dry, but hanging on a hook nearby was a totally soaked hand towel. Can you imagine what was going through her mind? This story became a treasure that brought the family closer together as they chose to find the humor in the experience. We all have days that go very differently than planned. The mother could have let this incident make her feel like a failure. Instead, she looked at the bright side of an embarrassing situation. Marjorie Pay Hinckley, the wife of President Gordon B. Hinckley, said, “The only way to get through life is to laugh your way through it. You either have to laugh or cry. I prefer to laugh. Crying gives me a headache.”1 “Arise and Shine Forth” How do you handle life’s challenges and not let them bring you down? In Doctrine and Covenants 115:5 the Lord told us, “Arise and shine forth, that thy light may be a standard for the nations.” The phrase “arise and shine forth” reminds me of the BYU fight song. I love this university! While I was a student here, I played basketball and football, and one of my fondest memories as an athlete was to run on the court or the field to the sound of “Rise and shout, the Cougars are out.” Have you ever seriously thought about the words to the fight song and pondered their meaning? Rise, all loyal Cougars, and hurl your challenge to the foe. You will fight day or night, rain or snow. Loyal, strong, and true, Wear the white and blue. While we sing, get set to spring. Come on, Cougars, it’s up to you!2 Let me share with you some lessons I have learned from people who exemplify the […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/s-gifford-nielsen_rise-shout-shine-forth/">Rise and Shout and Shine Forth!</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> S. Gifford Nielsen, 27 February 2018 S. Gifford Nielsen, 27 February 2018 S. Gifford Nielsen clean 25:34 What Makes a Radical and Revolutionary Technology? https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/dj-patil_makes-radical-revolutionary-technology/ Tue, 13 Feb 2018 22:35:16 +0000 http://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=15009 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/dj-patil_makes-radical-revolutionary-technology/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/dj-patil_makes-radical-revolutionary-technology/feed/ 0 <p> Full text for this forum will not be available. Instead, please access the video or enjoy this summary.   Dr. Dhanurjay “DJ” Patil shared how much good can be accomplished with an understanding of data science and sharing information at Tuesday’s BYU Forum. He shared many examples of how analyzing databases helped people, communities and the nation. Patil emphasized the incredible advances in technology that have happened in just the last decade. Technology brought us instant, real-time, on-demand, one-day shipping and more. Students can still remember growing up with paper maps, cord phones and not being able to DVR a favorite television show. “We have seen a technology revolution take place in our lifetime … in literally just a decade!” Patil said. Patil argued that data is behind the revolution. When he was the U.S. Chief Data Scientist, the mission statement included the charge “to responsibly unleash the power of data to benefit all Americans.” Patil focused on what responsibility to all Americans looks like, because this technology revolution is not happening for everyone. “A technology is neither radical nor revolutionary unless it benefits everyone,” said Patil. The way technology can help everyone is to have data and databases shared, in a secure way, so people can learn from their own and other’s processes. Data is used to look at what is actually happening, who is actually involved, and then applied in the most efficient way to help others and improve lives, Patil said. There are 11.4 million Americans who cycle through about 3,100 jails and stay an average of 23 days. The technology revolution is not helping these people nationwide, yet. Patil suggested the police force could have access to a database that is securely shared with local healthcare facilities. Then, when an officer arrests someone, she or he could check the database for the best place for that individual. If the arrested person has been cycling through jail, the database would reveal that and the person could be taken to a rehab facility or mental health institution instead. Patil said an area in Florida recently implemented a similar system. The result? Two jails were closed. “We have to make tech work for us, not against us,” said Patil. Another situation data-sharing could be implemented in is medicine. Patil said the problem is that the main database is fractured across thousands of databases. The solution has probably been found, but the data needs to be compiled and shared in order to recognize it. “When we empower people with data, we find that they do amazing things,” said Patil. Patil told several stories about people with medical problems who discovered the benefits of dating sharing and collaborated with others to find answers and sole problems. People are mapping the cracks and declines in sidewalks for people in wheelchairs, finding other families with similar diseases, and looking for cures to cancer. Patil emphasized that he only told stories of people being helped, because that’s what data science and technology is for. “No matter how much technology and […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/dj-patil_makes-radical-revolutionary-technology/">What Makes a Radical and Revolutionary Technology?</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Dhanurjay "DJ" Patil, 13 February 2018 Dhanurjay "DJ" Patil, 13 February 2018 Dhanurjay "DJ" Patil clean 41:40 Agency, Accountability, and the Atonement of Jesus Christ: Application to Sexual Assault https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/benjamin-m-ogles_agency-accountability-atonement-jesus-christ/ Tue, 30 Jan 2018 19:48:14 +0000 http://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=14929 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/benjamin-m-ogles_agency-accountability-atonement-jesus-christ/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/benjamin-m-ogles_agency-accountability-atonement-jesus-christ/feed/ 0 <p>As President Worthen mentioned, I earned two degrees at BYU. I also met my wife, Maureen, in a family home evening group while we were both students here. Returning to BYU after twenty-one years in Ohio felt like coming home. We love being a part of this great university. In 2017 many stories were published regarding sexual harassment and assault. Celebrities, politicians, and corporate executives were among those accused of being perpetrators.1 The #MeToo campaign in social media2 and Time magazine’s selection of “the silence breakers” as the Person of the Year3 highlighted the increasing, sometimes controversial, focus on this issue. The Chronicle of Higher Education, a newspaper for university faculty and administrators, recently started tracking sexual harassment stories as they came to light at universities across the nation.4 I watched these stories and others in the new year with particular interest, given two university responsibilities I have had over the last two years that focused on the issue of sexual assault. First, President Worthen asked me to serve on the Advisory Council on Campus Response to Sexual Assault. This council focused on examining the university’s response to incidents of sexual misconduct.5 Our charge was to determine how to better handle the reporting process for ­victims6 of sexual assault. To gather information, we set up a website where more than 3,100 people submitted feedback. Though it took many hours, we read every response, some of which described personal, heartbreaking experiences. Our work resulted in twenty-three recommendations, all of which have been or are being implemented at BYU, including developing an amnesty policy, changing organizational structure, creating a victim advocate position, and conducting a survey of BYU students regarding sexual assault.7 The second committee I served on surveyed all full-time students during the 2017 winter semester.8 Again we learned of some BYU students’ painful and distressing experiences with sexual assault. These committees were not my first encounter with the issue of sexual assault. As a stake president, I prayerfully strive to be a source of comfort and healing for victims seeking assistance. As a psychologist, I sometimes counsel those who suffer the consequences of abuse or assault. When I worked at Ohio University, I reviewed research on sexual assault while serving on dozens of thesis and dissertation committees for the graduate students of my colleague Dr. Christine Gidycz. Even with this background, my service on the Advisory Council and Campus Climate Survey Committee made me all the more keenly aware of the suffering that is associated with sexual assault. What added to my sorrow was the fact that here at BYU, even though we have high standards for our conduct, there are individuals who perpetrate or experience unwanted sexual contact. This was discouraging. Sexual assault is a difficult, highly charged, and sometimes political topic not easily discussed in any setting. I felt anxious and at times overwhelmed as I prepared this address. I did not volunteer to participate on the advisory council and certainly never imagined that I would deliver a […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/benjamin-m-ogles_agency-accountability-atonement-jesus-christ/">Agency, Accountability, and the Atonement of Jesus Christ: Application to Sexual Assault</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Benjamin M. Ogles, 30 January 2018 Benjamin M. Ogles, 30 January 2018 Benjamin M. Ogles clean 32:26 Turning Enemies into Friends https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/sharon-eubank_turning-enemies-friends/ Tue, 23 Jan 2018 19:45:52 +0000 http://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=14876 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/sharon-eubank_turning-enemies-friends/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/sharon-eubank_turning-enemies-friends/feed/ 0 <p>At Brigham Young University many years ago, there was a great athletic coach named Eugene L. Roberts. He grew up in Provo and, as a youth, sort of drifted aimlessly with the wrong kind of friends. And then something remarkable happened. I am going to read to you from his own words. He wrote: Several years ago when Provo City was scarred with the unsightly saloon and other questionable forms of amusement, I was standing one evening upon the street waiting for my gang to show up when I noticed that [the Provo] tabernacle was lighted up and that a large crowd of people were traveling in [that] direction. I had nothing to do so I drifted over [there] and drifted in. I thought I might find some of my gang, or at least some of the girls that I was interested in. Upon entering, I ran across three or four of [my] fellows and we placed ourselves under the gallery where there was a crowd of young ladies, who seemed to promise [some] entertainment. We were not interested in what came from the pulpit. We knew that the people on [the] rostrum were all old fogies. They didn’t know anything about life and they certainly couldn’t tell us anything, for we knew it all. So we settled down to have a good time. Right in the midst of our disturbance there thundered from [the] pulpit the following [statement]: “You can’t tell the character of an individual by the way he does his daily work. Watch him when his work is over. See where he goes. Note the companions he seeks, and the things he does when he may do as he pleases. Then you can tell his true character.” I looked up towards the rostrum because I was struck with this powerful statement. I saw up there a little dark-haired, fierce-eyed, fighting man whom I knew and feared; but didn’t have any particular love for. . . . . . . He went on to make a comparison. He said: “Let us take the eagle, for example. This bird works as hard and as efficiently as any other animal in doing its daily work. It provides for itself and its young by the sweat of its brow, so to speak; but when its daily work is over and the eagle has time of its own to do just as it pleases, note how it spends its recreational moments. It flies to the highest realms of heaven, spreads its wings, and bathes in the upper air, for it loves the pure, clean atmosphere, and the lofty heights. “On the other hand, let us consider the hog. This animal grunts and grubs and provides for its young just as well as the eagle; but, when its working hours are over and it has [some] recreational moments, observe where it goes and what it does. The hog will seek out the muddiest hole in the pasture and will roll and soak itself in filth, for this […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/sharon-eubank_turning-enemies-friends/">Turning Enemies into Friends</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Sharon Eubank, 23 January 2018 Sharon Eubank, 23 January 2018 Sharon Eubank clean 31:05 Humbly Combining Heart and Mind https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/legrand-r-curtis_humbly-combining-heart-mind/ Tue, 16 Jan 2018 20:04:24 +0000 http://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=14845 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/legrand-r-curtis_humbly-combining-heart-mind/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/legrand-r-curtis_humbly-combining-heart-mind/feed/ 0 <p>It is wonderful to be back at BYU today. I was a student here in the early 1970s. During that time, some important things happened here, including the construction of the Marriott Center, the appointment of President Dallin H. Oaks as president of the university, the building of the Provo Temple, and the hiring of LaVell Edwards as head football coach and him taking his team to BYU’s first bowl game, the 1974 Fiesta Bowl. During that time, several important things also happened in my life, including receiving my mission call and serving a mission, getting engaged and married, becoming a father, and graduating with a degree in economics. I would like to speak about another important thing that happened to me during my time as a student here. The Mind and the Heart Together There is an interesting connection in the scriptures between the heart and the mind. Consider this verse from an early revelation given to the Prophet Joseph Smith concerning the process of knowledge being revealed: Yea, behold, I will tell you in your mind and in your heart, by the Holy Ghost, which shall come upon you and which shall dwell in your heart.1 From this verse it is clear that the process of revelation can include both ideas to our minds and feelings to our hearts. In the next section the Lord further described this process: Behold, you have not understood; you have supposed that I would give it unto you, when you took no thought save it was to ask me. But, behold, I say unto you, that you must study it out in your mind; then you must ask me if it be right, and if it is right I will cause that your bosom shall burn within you; therefore, you shall feel that it is right. But if it be not right you shall have no such feelings, but you shall have a stupor of thought that shall cause you to forget the thing which is wrong.2 These verses once again speak of the mind as well as feelings that are manifest inside us—in this case, a burning in the bosom. This expression is reminiscent of a passage in Luke 24, when one of the disciples who walked with the risen Christ on the road to Emmaus said to the other disciple with whom he had shared that experience, “Did not our heart burn within us, while he talked with us by the way, and while he opened to us the scriptures?”3 Both passages, whether referring to feelings in the heart or the bosom, are referring to “the workings of the Spirit”4 that we can feel within us as part of revelation. The prophet Mormon, in describing the revelation to include the small plates of Nephi with his compiled record, said: And I do this for a wise purpose; for thus it whispereth me, according to the workings of the Spirit of the Lord which is in me. And now, I do not […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/legrand-r-curtis_humbly-combining-heart-mind/">Humbly Combining Heart and Mind</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> LeGrand R. Curtis, Jr., 16 January 2018 LeGrand R. Curtis, Jr., 16 January 2018 LeGrand R. Curtis, Jr. clean 25:35 Lessons from Roses: Trust Yourself and Trust God https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/peggy-s-worthen_trust-yourself-trust-god/ Tue, 09 Jan 2018 22:27:38 +0000 http://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=14834 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/peggy-s-worthen_trust-yourself-trust-god/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/peggy-s-worthen_trust-yourself-trust-god/feed/ 0 <p>Years ago, when we were landscaping the yard of our new home, my father, who owned a hardware store, asked me if I would like some rose bushes that he had for sale at a very discounted price. It was an offer I couldn’t refuse. I thought that roses would look very nice next to the white rail fence that bordered our front yard. I bought more than twenty rose bushes. We live close to the base of Rock Canyon, which means that there is very little soil and a lot of rocks. Kevin took on the arduous task of digging the holes for the roses. Due to the difficulty of digging, we decided to dig the holes just big enough to pour in enough soil to surround the roots of the roses—not really the ideal amount of soil, but, given the situation, we hoped it would be adequate. As it turns out, it was. Our roses thrived. We really didn’t do too much to them. They were watered whenever the lawn was watered, they received plenty of sunshine, and, happily, they did well in our yard, rocks and all. Normally I would prune the roses as soon as it looked like they needed it. One year, however, I waited longer than usual to prune them—about a month longer. The roses already had quite a bit of new growth on them, but I decided to prune them anyway. When I was finished, there wasn’t much left. I had cut them back drastically—much more than I usually did. But I was pleased with the results. Who knew that pruning roses a month later than usual—and drastically at that—would have unexpected consequences? Immediately after I had pruned the roses, I had several people tell me that it was too late in the season for cutting roses and that I had cut them back too much. Initially it didn’t bother me, but pretty soon I began to believe them. I started to feel like I had done something I shouldn’t have. I started to doubt my decision. I was sorry I had cut my roses. I remember one man asking me incredulously, “What have you done? Do you realize that you won’t have roses this year?” And a woman in our neighborhood who had a lovely garden quipped, “You shouldn’t have cut them so late and so much!” And then she added, “Oh well, we live and we learn.” I felt terrible. I believed I had ruined my roses! At that point I did the only thing I could think of doing. I called my mother! I knew she would help me feel better. She was a gardener. She had roses. I told her about the terrible thing I had done. And, to my pleasant surprise, she assured me that I hadn’t done anything wrong. She advised me to go to a nursery and buy a book on roses. I would find that I hadn’t ruined them. I did as she suggested. I bought a book on […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/peggy-s-worthen_trust-yourself-trust-god/">Lessons from Roses: Trust Yourself and Trust God</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Peggy S. Worthen, 9 January 2018 Peggy S. Worthen, 9 January 2018 Peggy S. Worthen clean 10:00 The Plan of Salvation: The Gospel Paradigm https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/kevin-j-worthen_plan-salvation/ Tue, 09 Jan 2018 16:32:01 +0000 http://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=14826 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/kevin-j-worthen_plan-salvation/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/kevin-j-worthen_plan-salvation/feed/ 0 <p>In 1962, Thomas Kuhn published a book, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, in which he set forth his view that development in scientific knowledge did not progress in a linear, continuous fashion but rather through periodic radical changes in the framework through which scientific questions are considered. Kuhn called these radical changes “paradigm shifts.”1 While the validity of Kuhn’s theory has been extensively debated in the last fifty years, there is little dispute that his book brought the terms paradigm shift and paradigm into popular culture. Today, dictionaries broadly define a paradigm as “a philosophical or theoretical framework.”2 It is a set of principles or ideas that provides a particular way of interpreting events. One textbook explains: A paradigm is . . . a way of thinking about or viewing the world. . . . A paradigm is like the lens on a pair of glasses. . . . If you put on red glasses, everything looks red. If you put on pink glasses, the world looks pink. If you put on yellow glasses, everything around you looks more yellow.3 All of us view events through particular paradigms or lenses. If the lenses are accurate, the paradigm enhances our understanding and knowledge. If they are distorted, we sometimes make mistakes, which causes a paradigm shift. Let me illustrate with a short video. [The video portrayed a conversation between two men over a ship radio arguing who will change course. The ship’s captain insists the other change his course to avoid collision, only to find out the other voice is speaking from a lighthouse.4] Now that is what you might call a paradigm shift. There have always been competing paradigms in every discipline and, more important, in the overall cultures in which we live. This is especially evident in today’s society, in which people can view the same event and reach dramatically different conclusions, not only as to what the event means but even as to what actually happened. Given the confusion that these competing paradigms seem to engender, we are blessed to live in a time and situation in which we have modern-day revelation to provide a more complete and accurate framework in which all our lives’ events, both individually and globally, can be better understood. While these latter-day revelations in one sense have effectuated a remarkable paradigm shift in religious understanding, in another sense they are really a restoration of a paradigm or framework that God provided to His children from the beginning of time—a framework for understanding all the events in the world, from before its creation and extending through its future millennial season into the eternities. This framework or paradigm has various names. “In the scriptures God’s plan is called a merciful plan, the plan of happiness, the plan of redemption, and the plan of salvation.”5 As explained by Elder Dallin H. Oaks at the April 2017 general conference, this plan—God’s plan for His children—is quite simple, yet very profound. It answers humanity’s deepest questions and provides a framework for finding answers to our […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/kevin-j-worthen_plan-salvation/">The Plan of Salvation: The Gospel Paradigm</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Kevin J Worthen, 9 January 2018 Kevin J Worthen, 9 January 2018 Kevin J Worthen clean 19:42 A Message at Christmas https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/d-todd-christofferson_a-message-at-christmas/ Tue, 12 Dec 2017 16:23:26 +0000 http://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=14690 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/d-todd-christofferson_a-message-at-christmas/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/d-todd-christofferson_a-message-at-christmas/feed/ 0 <p>Christmas is coming. But so are final exams. So, while Christmas is coming, stress is already here. Years ago, when my wife, Kathy, and I were in your place, the schedule was a bit different. The fall semester ended in January, and finals came after the Christmas holiday. We would all dutifully take a suitcase or box of books home with us or wherever we were going for the Christmas break. We had every intention of devoting hours to studying for finals in addition to celebrating Christmas. Of course we never cracked a book. Rather, we just felt guilty the whole time, and it ruined the holiday. So if you are looking for sympathy from me because you have final exams right before Christmas, forget it. In all seriousness, I do wish you the best on your finals. May your preparations be fully rewarded, with perhaps a little divine aid added in for good measure. And may this particular Christmas season be for you a season of renewal. May you be blessed with a deep sense of gratitude. It is interesting to read some of the accounts of Christmas from our pioneer forebears. Elizabeth Huffaker wrote of the very first Christmas in the Salt Lake Valley in December 1847: I remember our first Christmas in the valley. We all worked as usual. The men gathered sage-brush, and some even ploughed, for, though it had snowed, the ground was still soft, and the ploughs were used nearly the entire day. Christmas came on Saturday. We celebrated the day on the Sabbath, when all gathered around the flagpole in the centre of the fort, and there we held meeting. And what a meeting it was. We sang praise to God; we all joined in the opening prayer, and the speaking that day has always been remembered. There were words of thanksgiving and cheer. The people were hopeful and buoyant, because of their faith in the great work they were undertaking. After the meeting, there was handshaking all around. Some wept for joy, the children played in the enclosure, and around a sage-brush fire that night we gathered and sang: “Come, come, ye Saints, No toil nor labor fear, But with joy wend your way!” That day we had boiled rabbit and a little bread for our dinner. Father had shot some rabbits, and it was a feast we had. All had enough to eat. In the sense of perfect peace and good-will, I never had a happier Christmas in all my life.1 It is difficult for most of us to appreciate what a blessing it was for them simply to have peace—to have very little of the necessities of life but, at last, to have peace. Susan Wells remembered Christmas two years later in Salt Lake in December 1849, when there was a more formal party: I well remember Brother Brigham’s [Christmas] party [of 1849]. Like the girls of today, on receiving my invitation the first thought was “nothing to wear.” This […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/d-todd-christofferson_a-message-at-christmas/">A Message at Christmas</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Christmas is coming. But so are final exams. So, while Christmas is coming, stress is already here. Years ago, when my wife, Kathy, and I were in your place, the schedule was a bit different. The fall semester ended in January, D. Todd Christofferson, 12 December 2017 D. Todd Christofferson clean D. Todd Christofferson, 12 December 2017 Happiness, Deceit, and Small Things https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/brian-k-ashton_happiness-deceit-small-things/ Tue, 05 Dec 2017 22:14:41 +0000 http://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=14653 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/brian-k-ashton_happiness-deceit-small-things/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/brian-k-ashton_happiness-deceit-small-things/feed/ 0 <p>Brothers and sisters, it is a privilege to be with you this morning. Both Melinda and I graduated from BYU, and we love coming back. I prepared this talk with my children and my missionaries in mind. I would like to talk with each of you from my heart as if you were one of my children or my missionaries. Would you please take a moment to think about what you want in the future? I suspect that many things might enter your mind. Some of them might be quite short term: getting a date for the weekend, doing well on finals or your end-of-term paper, or finding transportation home for Christmas. Other desires might include longer-term dreams: having a happy marriage and family, getting into graduate school, obtaining a good job, achieving financial success, living in a certain location, or buying a new car. Whatever your hopes and dreams are for the future, I suspect that you want those things because you believe they will bring you happiness. Ultimately, happiness is what we all desire. When I was a student at BYU, I thought a lot about my future. I suspect you think a lot about yours as well. Once I got to the future—meaning life after BYU—I learned three critical lessons that made a big difference in my life. I want to share these lessons with you with the hope that you don’t take as long as I did to learn them. They are lessons that can help you find greater joy in life—and ultimately obtain exaltation with your Heavenly Father. Lesson One: True Happiness Comes from Having the Spirit in Our Lives Lesson number one begins with a story. I met my wife, Melinda, during my sophomore year at BYU, about six months after I had returned from my mission. I knew immediately that Melinda was the woman I wanted to marry. Melinda, however, did not have the same experience. It wasn’t until five years later that she finally received an answer that it would be “okay” if she married me. During those five years—actually nearly five-and-a-half years, if you include our engagement—I had one of the more difficult trials of my life. I really wanted to be married. I knew whom I was supposed to marry, and the Spirit urged me on, but I couldn’t seem to reach that goal. Nothing I did seemed to help our relationship move forward as quickly as I wanted. It was five-plus years of frustration and—more important—refinement for me. Shortly after I had graduated from BYU, Melinda decided to go on a mission—in part, I am convinced, to get away from me. I was concerned that while she served in Spain, my misery would increase as I waited for her. And there were times when I was miserable because I focused on what I didn’t have and I failed to exercise faith in God’s promises. However, I was studying the scriptures and praying daily, serving in the Church, and striving to do […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/brian-k-ashton_happiness-deceit-small-things/">Happiness, Deceit, and Small Things</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Brian K. Ashton, 5 December 2017 Brian K. Ashton, 5 December 2017 Brian K. Ashton clean Questions and Answers https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/m-russell-ballard_questions-and-answers/ Tue, 14 Nov 2017 19:44:23 +0000 http://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=14565 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/m-russell-ballard_questions-and-answers/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/m-russell-ballard_questions-and-answers/feed/ 0 <p>I am now in my ninetieth year and have been happily married to my dear wife, Barbara, for sixty-six years. We have been blessed with seven children, forty-three grandchildren, and eighty-six great-grandchildren—with more on the way! I want to include you in our family today. I would like you to picture me as your grandfather who believes in you and who is cheering for you. I love you and constantly pray for you. A year ago I spoke to our full-time religious educators and explained that we need to listen more and do our best to respond to sincere questions.1 An adapted version of that talk appeared in the Ensign magazine last December with the hope that all parents, Church leaders, and teachers would do their best to listen and to respond to the questions from those they love.2 Recently I learned about a time when Joseph Smith answered twenty questions he had received. The questions, along with his responses, were published in the Church’s newspaper, the Elders’ Journal, in July 1838. We do not have time to explore those twenty questions, but I did pick two of them. The first is an excellent question: “What are the fundamental principles of your religion?” The Prophet responded: The fundamental principles of our religion [are] the testimony of the apostles and prophets concerning Jesus Christ, “that he died, was buried, and rose again the third day, and ascended up into heaven”; and all other things are only appendages to these, which pertain to our religion.3 Joseph’s answer reminds us what is most important and essential: the core gospel message of the restored Church of Jesus Christ. I smiled at Joseph’s response to another question in the series: “Did not Jo Smith steal his wife?” The Prophet’s tongue-in-cheek answer reveals his witty personality: “Ask her; she was of age, she can answer for herself.”4 Since then, Church leaders have taken many opportunities to respond to questions in various settings. Unfortunately, passing around a portable microphone in the Marriott Center is virtually impossible today, so I invited two local young single adult stake presidents and several BYU professors to solicit questions in advance for my consideration in preparing my talk for you. In the end, I was surprised how many questions you have. I received 767 of them! They covered a variety of topics, including life at BYU, dating, doctrine, marriage, revelation, seeking perfection, and showing love to others. I wish I could respond to every question. However, reviewing the questions has been a blessing to me because it gave me another window through which to consider the issues and challenges you face. As we begin to consider some of your questions, it is important to remember that I am a General Authority, but that does not make me an authority in general! My calling and life experiences allow me to respond to certain types of questions. There are other types of questions that require an expert in a specific subject matter. This is exactly what I […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/m-russell-ballard_questions-and-answers/">Questions and Answers</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> M. Russell Ballard, 14 November 2017 M. Russell Ballard, 14 November 2017 M. Russell Ballard clean Are You All the Way In? https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/carolyn-billings_way-trust-lord-raging-tempests/ Tue, 17 Oct 2017 18:34:07 +0000 http://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=14364 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/carolyn-billings_way-trust-lord-raging-tempests/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/carolyn-billings_way-trust-lord-raging-tempests/feed/ 0 <p>I would like to let my staff, my students, and my athletes know that I am just as surprised as you are to see me up here, but please don’t let it shake your testimony or your confidence in BYU. When I was about four years old, I fell out of my bed. My father heard me crying and came into my room to check on me. As he helped me get back into my bed, he asked, with all of the compassion of a loving father, why I had fallen out of bed. He always loved to tell me how I had looked up at him and said, with the eye roll of a rational four-year-old, “Obviously I wasn’t in far enough!” As a result, that statement became the question that my father would ask me every time I encountered a struggle, trial, or difficult problem. To this day I continue to ask myself, “Am I in far enough?” I don’t want to burst your bubble by telling you that this life will include tests, trials, and tribulations and that some of the trials you will face in life will be excruciating. What you do need to know is that, according to my friends, I am not the luckiest person in the world and I have had my share of challenges. We will all experience affliction, so I hope that sharing how I learned to get all the way in will help you along your path in college and in life. Riding Out the Raging Tempests I remember being a student at this ­university. I came from a great home and was raised by incredible parents who shared their ­testimonies through word and deed. I felt confident as I entered BYU that I had a solid footing in the Church. However, it was during my college life that I started to experience small struggles that began to test my testimony and my commitment to our Savior. It started with having to make my own ­decisions to go to church, say my prayers, and read my scriptures. And then came the self-doubt, the struggle of suddenly being average, the loneliness, and the experience of my first C grade being thrown at me. Next came the curveball of dating and breaking up combined with a “small” amount of pressure to get married, all while I was ­living with roommates who did not do the dishes and also while no one was liking my Instagram posts—well, at least back then I didn’t have to worry about Instagram or Facebook. It was at a particularly low moment in college that I came across the hymn “Master, the Tempest Is Raging” (Hymns, 2002, no. 105). The second verse described perfectly how I was feeling at that moment: Master, with anguish of spirit I bow in my grief today. The depths of my sad heart are troubled. Oh, waken and save, I pray! Torrents of sin and of anguish Sweep o’er my sinking soul, And I perish! I perish! […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/carolyn-billings_way-trust-lord-raging-tempests/">Are You All the Way In?</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Carolyn Billings, 17 October 2017 Carolyn Billings, 17 October 2017 Carolyn Billings clean 22:13 Putting Off the Natural Man and Becoming Saints https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/carl-b-cook_putting-natural-man-becoming-saints/ Tue, 10 Oct 2017 18:15:53 +0000 http://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=14258 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/carl-b-cook_putting-natural-man-becoming-saints/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/carl-b-cook_putting-natural-man-becoming-saints/feed/ 0 <p>Brothers and sisters, it is nice to be with you. You are an amazing sight. Being here today reminds me of an experience I had a few years ago. Sister Cook and I were asked to speak in another university setting, and when my mother-in-law heard about it, she said, “Oh, aren’t you scared?” Actually, I was a little scared, but feeling somewhat curious, I asked her, “Why should I be scared?” She said, “Because students are so intelligent!” That was a nice compliment for the students, but it didn’t say much for what my mother-in-law thought of me and my intelligence! Today I realize that I am speaking to a group of very intelligent and educated people, but I am not scared, because the topic I would like to address is applicable to each of us in a very personal way. It is how we can put off the natural man or the natural woman and become Saints through Jesus Christ and His Atonement. This is something I have been working on for many years—battling with the natural man. But I am determined to never relax, retreat, or retire from the fight. Putting Off the Natural Man or Woman The natural man or woman is the mortal part of us that allows the physical, the temporal, or our own desires to overrule our inherent spiritual goodness and our desires to become like our Heavenly Parents (see Spencer W. Kimball, “Ocean Currents and Family Influences,” Ensign, November 1974). Of course the fight will not be won immediately. It is a daily battle for each of us, and we are dependent upon God and Jesus Christ to help us change our nature. We are taught in the Book of Mormon: For the natural man is an enemy to God, and has been from the fall of Adam, and will be, forever and ever, unless he yields to the enticings of the Holy Spirit, and putteth off the natural man and becometh a saint through the atonement of Christ the Lord, and becometh as a child, submissive, meek, humble, patient, full of love, willing to submit to all things which the Lord seeth fit to inflict upon him, even as a child doth submit to his father. [Mosiah 3:19] Spinner I actually had a horse who helped me appreciate the amazing process of change. When our children were young, my wife and I looked for a gentle, well-broke children’s horse. Our neighbor had such a horse, but he would sell us kind and gentle Bob only if we also bought his other horse, Stubby. The names alone describe the horses. Eventually we decided to purchase both horses in order to acquire Bob. Sure enough, Bob was wonderful, and Stubby ended up being, as expected, a stubborn, strong-willed, obnoxious animal who consistently acted up and caused trouble with the other horses. Because of our limited number of horses, I usually ended up riding Stubby during our family rides. He was defiant. When I tried […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/carl-b-cook_putting-natural-man-becoming-saints/">Putting Off the Natural Man and Becoming Saints</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Carl B. Cook, 10 October 2017 Carl B. Cook, 10 October 2017 Carl B. Cook clean 27:47 Shape Your Life Through Service to Others https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/richard-j-maynes_shape-life-service-others/ Tue, 19 Sep 2017 22:29:01 +0000 http://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=14092 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/richard-j-maynes_shape-life-service-others/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/richard-j-maynes_shape-life-service-others/feed/ 0 <p>Good morning, my young brothers and sisters. You are an inspiring sight. I have the opportunity to visit your campus often with my various Church assignments, but seeing you here today brings back a flood of wonderful memories from a time in my life when I sat where you are now sitting. The year was 1968, and I was a freshman here at Brigham Young University. I remember well the excitement and, of course, the anxiety that many of you who are entering as freshmen are feeling right now, not knowing exactly what lies ahead. To those of you who are returning for your sophomore, junior, or senior years, I likewise know the excitement and anxiety you are feeling because you are beginning to have a better sense of what lies ahead. After beginning my studies here in 1968, I had the privilege of serving a full-time mission between 1970 and 1972. After my mission, I returned to finish my studies and graduated in the summer of 1974. I married my beautiful wife, Nancy, the day after I graduated. We have four children, all of whom have graduated from Brigham Young University. Our family has great memories of BYU, and it is wonderful to be back on campus with you today. Enter to Learn; Go Forth to Serve Brothers and sisters, I feel I was led to focus my message this morning on the gospel principle that has been the source of the most joy and fulfillment in my life throughout the forty-three years since my graduation from this very special institution. Therefore, with this thought in mind, I have entitled my message “Shape Your Life Through Service to Others.” Like many of you, when I arrived on campus as a freshman, I was greeted by the large sign on the western edge of campus that reads, “Enter to learn; go forth to serve.” Not only is this one of the first sights most people see when they arrive on campus, but I think it is also one of the last sights they see, as it has become the backdrop for many a picture as students celebrate their graduation day with loved ones. Ernest L. Wilkinson, a past president of Brigham Young University, adopted the slogan for the university in 1966. For more than fifty years now the slogan has greeted students and ­faculty, ­parents and visitors, and ambassadors and ­dignitaries from across the globe. While speaking here in 2003, President Gordon B. Hinckley urged every student to make “Enter to learn; go forth to serve” his or her  personal motto. President Hinckley said at that time: Mediocrity will never do. You are capable of something better. . . . Walk the high road of charity, respect, and love for others and particularly those who are less fortunate.1 Please remember, my young friends, that being the best at something doesn’t make you a good person. You can be number one in your academic field, you can be an accomplished musician or artist, or you can be […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/richard-j-maynes_shape-life-service-others/">Shape Your Life Through Service to Others</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Richard J. Maynes, 19 September 2017 Richard J. Maynes, 19 September 2017 Richard J. Maynes clean 29:03 Fear Not https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/kevin-j-worthen_fear-not-2/ Tue, 12 Sep 2017 18:35:12 +0000 http://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=14041 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/kevin-j-worthen_fear-not-2/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/kevin-j-worthen_fear-not-2/feed/ 0 <p>It is a joy to join with Peggy in welcoming you to another school year. You are a wonderful sight, and this campus takes on new energy as you arrive here. We are grateful for that. My message today focuses on one of the most oft-repeated and yet most oft-overlooked and ignored and maybe violated commandments. By my count this commandment is repeated seventy-six times in the scriptures.1 The commandment was the first thing spoken by the angels who announced Christ’s birth to the shepherds outside Bethlehem.2 It was also the first thing spoken by the angels who announced Christ’s Resurrection to the women at the empty tomb.3 The commandment was conveyed by the angels who informed Mary and Joseph about their roles in the Savior’s mortal ministry,4 and it was part of the message of the angel who appeared to Zacharias to reveal the upcoming birth of John the Baptist.5 The commandment is repeated in at least two of our LDS hymns.6 It is a commandment that is found so frequently in the scriptures that we may not recognize its profound importance, especially for the times in which we live and the stage of life in which you students find yourselves. The commandment is a simple two-word injunction: “fear not.” Some may question whether the directive to “fear not” is actually a commandment. True, it is not preceded by the familiar “thou shalt not,” and it was not written on stone tablets. But it is clearly an imperative repeated often enough by divinely authorized sources, including many times by the Savior Himself,7 that it certainly seems like a commandment. More important, like all commandments, adherence to this two-word injunction will make our mortal journey both more productive and more joyful. This is not a new topic. It has been preached over this pulpit8 as well as over the pulpit in the LDS Conference Center.9 But I believe it is one that is of particular relevance as we begin a new school year with all of its challenges in a world that seems increasingly full of fears. I firmly believe that if we increase our compliance with this important commandment, the coming year and the endless years that succeed it will be better. With that belief in mind, let me first explore the meaning of this sometimes misunderstood commandment and then describe four things we can do to increase our ability to comply with its principles. What Is Fear? To understand the commandment to fear not, we first have to understand what we mean by fear. What exactly are we supposed to avoid? According to one source, “fear is a feeling induced by perceived danger or threat that . . . ultimately [leads to] a change in behavior.”10 As this broad definition suggests, not all fear is bad. Were it not for this emotion, we would not flee from or avoid things that would actually harm us. The feeling that might arise when we hear the signature tail warning of a rattlesnake […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/kevin-j-worthen_fear-not-2/">Fear Not</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Kevin J Worthen, 12 September 2017 Kevin J Worthen, 12 September 2017 Kevin J Worthen clean 22:00 Kevin J Worthen, 12 September 2017 Facing the Algebras of Life https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/peggy-s-worthen_facing-algebras-life/ Tue, 12 Sep 2017 15:35:31 +0000 http://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=14079 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/peggy-s-worthen_facing-algebras-life/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/peggy-s-worthen_facing-algebras-life/feed/ 0 <p>Welcome to fall semester 2017. I hope you have a wonderful experience this year at BYU. I remember my first semester here as a student. I was thrilled at the thought that I was finally going to further my education, but, at the same time, I have to admit I was somewhat anxious. The prospect of being a student at BYU was daunting. I was a nontraditional student returning to school when our youngest child was in kindergarten. I remember looking at the syllabus of each class and wondering if I could do everything that was required. I had chosen English as a major and was looking forward to attending all of the classes. I hoped I could keep up. I say I was looking forward to attending all of the classes, and that is mostly true, but there was one exception: intermediate algebra. Algebra and I have a dubious history. Algebra was a required course in junior high and in high school, and I learned quickly that algebra was not one of my strong points. I did manage, however, to pass those precollege algebra classes—mainly by doing extra-credit assignments given to me by sympathetic algebra teachers. So, knowing what I knew about my history with algebra and knowing that I would have to take the intermediate algebra class in order to graduate from BYU, I did the only thing I could think of: I procrastinated. The problem with procrastination is that whatever you choose to procrastinate never seems to go away. Instead it looms large. The time finally came when I could procrastinate no longer. It was the last semester of my senior year—the proverbial eleventh hour. I finally registered for the algebra class, attended the first day of class, and immediately knew I was in over my head. My friend Mary, who is a mathematical whiz, could sense my panic. She suggested that I drop the class and register for the independent study algebra course. She said she would tutor me. I was so grateful to her. That was the beginning of what my family calls “the year that Mom took algebra.” It consumed a lot of my time. Passing my algebra class became a family project. Not only did I have the help of my friend Mary, who tutored me, but I also had Kevin’s help and the help of my two sons. They spent hours helping me with my homework. They truly endured this experience with me. When I wasn’t working on my homework, it seemed like I was expressing my discontent to anyone who would listen. In other words, I complained a lot. I remember complaining to my mother about the fact that I was an English major and that I didn’t understand why I even had to take algebra. In a very reassuring, motherly way, she said, “Peggy, you never know when you are going to need algebra.” I am sure she thought it was good counsel, but I was forty-three years old and had […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/peggy-s-worthen_facing-algebras-life/">Facing the Algebras of Life</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Peggy Worthen, 12 September 2017 Peggy Worthen, 12 September 2017 Peggy Worthen clean 10:00 Peggy Worthen, 12 September 2017 Be 100 Percent Responsible https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/lynn-g-robbins_be-100-percent-responsible/ Tue, 22 Aug 2017 18:38:59 +0000 http://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=13885 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/lynn-g-robbins_be-100-percent-responsible/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/lynn-g-robbins_be-100-percent-responsible/feed/ 0 <p>Brothers and sisters, I am grateful to be with you in this opening session of the 2017 BYU Campus Education Week. This year’s theme comes from Doctrine and Covenants 50:24, with special emphasis on these words: “And he that receiveth light, and continueth in God, receiveth more light.” I am going to take a different approach to this theme than might be expected by exposing and illustrating some very cunning and effective ways that the “wicked one” prevents people from progressing and receiving more light (D&C 93:39). Many gospel principles come in pairs, meaning one is incomplete without the other. I want to refer to three of these doctrinal pairs today: Agency and responsibility Mercy and justice Faith and works When Satan is successful in dividing doctrinal pairs, he begins to wreak havoc upon mankind. It is one of his most cunning strategies to keep people from growing in the light. You already know that faith without works really isn’t faith (see James 2:17). My primary focus will be on the other two doctrinal pairs: first, to illustrate how avoiding responsibility affects agency; and second, how “denying justice,” as it is referred to in the Book of Mormon (see Alma 42:30), affects mercy. The Book of Mormon teaches us that we are agents to “act . . . and not to be acted upon” (2 Nephi 2:26)—or to be “free to act for [our]selves” (2 Nephi 10:23). This freedom of choice was not a gift of partial agency but of complete and total 100 percent agency. It was absolute in the sense that the One Perfect Parent never forces His children. He shows us the way and may even command us, but, “nevertheless, thou mayest choose for thyself, for it is given unto thee” (Moses 3:17). Assuming responsibility and being accountable for our choices are agency’s complementary principles (see D&C 101:78). Responsibility is to recognize ourselves as being the cause for the effects or results of our choices—good or bad. On the negative side, it is to always own up to the consequences of poor choices. Except for those held innocent, such as little children and the intellectually disabled, gospel doctrine teaches us that each person is responsible for the use of their agency and “will be punished for their own sins” (Articles of Faith 1:2).1 It isn’t just a heavenly principle but a law of nature—we reap what we sow. Logically then, complete and total agency comes with complete and total responsibility: And now remember, remember, my brethren, that whosoever perisheth, perisheth unto himself; and whosoever doeth iniquity, doeth it unto himself; for behold, ye are free; ye are permitted to act for yourselves; for behold, God hath given unto you a knowledge and he hath made you free. [Helaman 14:30; emphasis added] The Korihor Principle—Separating Agency from Responsibility One of Satan’s most crafty strategies to gain control of our agency isn’t a frontal attack on our agency but a sneaky backdoor assault on responsibility. Without responsibility, every good gift from God could […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/lynn-g-robbins_be-100-percent-responsible/">Be 100 Percent Responsible</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Lynn G. Robbins, 22 August 2017 Lynn G. Robbins, 22 August 2017 Lynn G. Robbins clean 48:40 Lynn G. Robbins, 22 August 2017 To Me He Doth Not Stink: Advocacy and Love https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/gayla-m-sorenson_doth-not-stink-advocacy-love/ Tue, 08 Aug 2017 19:05:54 +0000 http://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=13775 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/gayla-m-sorenson_doth-not-stink-advocacy-love/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/gayla-m-sorenson_doth-not-stink-advocacy-love/feed/ 0 <p>Since I first learned how, I have loved to talk. Marilyn and Denise, my two older sisters, used to set the kitchen timer for five minutes, challenging me to go that long without saying a word. I never once made it the whole five minutes. Talking in the kitchen to your siblings, however, is very different from talking in this concert hall to a large and diverse audience. Accordingly, I am both excited and humbled by this opportunity to speak to you. But I want this experience to be much more than just my talking to you. I want this experience to be one in which the Spirit teaches and edifies, and I appreciate the music and the prayer that have helped set the tone for this to take place. In addition to loving to talk—and in part because I love to talk—I love being a lawyer. As a junior in high school, I decided I wanted to be a lawyer for two reasons: First, I wanted to be different by going into a challenging profession in which not many women were employed—this was in the mid-seventies, when less than 20 percent of the attorneys in America were women.1 Second, I wanted to be rich. I didn’t have any clearly formed ideas of what I would do with the money I made, but in my small hometown of Brownfield, Texas, having a swimming pool in your backyard was a pretty big deal, and I think that was my primary aspiration at the time. As I found out more about being a lawyer, I learned of two outstanding attorneys: Rex E. Lee and Dallin H. Oaks. They were faithful members of the Church, and they had achieved very visible levels of professional excellence. They became my ideals. My choice of a major as a freshman at BYU was simplified when I discovered that they had both been accounting majors, so accounting was my choice as well. I was in heaven when I discovered that two of then BYU president Dallin Oaks’s sons not only were in my BYU ward but were assigned to my family home evening group. I had visions of dazzling them and finding myself a member of President Oaks’s inner circle. However, my Texas twang dashed these hopes. Upon learning I had an academic scholarship, one of my freshman friends informed me that I must be a lot smarter than I sounded. I accepted that I was not going to dazzle anyone, and I am still waiting for an entrée to Elder Oaks’s inner circle. Nevertheless, I held on to my desire to emulate him by studying the law, and I absorbed the content, organization, and cadence of his talks. I was likewise thrilled my freshman year to be invited to a lunch hosted by none other than Rex E. Lee, who was then dean of the still new J. Reuben Clark Law School. It was a privilege to meet him, and I still remember his infectious smile and how he made me feel important. […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/gayla-m-sorenson_doth-not-stink-advocacy-love/">To Me He Doth Not Stink: Advocacy and Love</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Gayla M. Sorenson, 8 August 2017 Gayla M. Sorenson, 8 August 2017 Gayla M. Sorenson clean 28:07 Gayla M. Sorenson, 8 August 2017 Living a Life of Service and Love: What Goes Around Comes Around https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/kirt-r-saville_living-life-service-love-goes-around-comes-around/ Tue, 01 Aug 2017 19:22:14 +0000 http://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=13709 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/kirt-r-saville_living-life-service-love-goes-around-comes-around/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/kirt-r-saville_living-life-service-love-goes-around-comes-around/feed/ 0 <p>I would like to begin my remarks today by paying tribute to my parents. It wasn’t until I began serving my mission that I realized some parents don’t value their children, don’t do everything within their power to make their lives better, and don’t help their children aspire to be the best they can be. I was one of the fortunate ones, along with my brother and sister, to be born into a family where I was loved, nurtured, and taught by loving parents. They had high expectations for me, but when I failed, they were still there to guide, encourage, and show me how to pick myself up and move forward. My parents, to the best of my knowledge, had never been very active in the Church. They encouraged us children to attend, but their attendance was infrequent. Yet it was from them that I learned how to live a Christian life. My father, in particular, was the kind of person who could never pass by someone who needed help. I recall a trip that we made from Salt Lake City to Bear Lake, where a weekend of clear blue water, swimming, water skiing, and fun awaited me. Our typical route was to go to Evanston, Wyoming, and then on to Bear Lake. About twenty miles to the southwest of Evanston, my father noticed a man was trying to flag down cars on the other side of the divided highway. My father could never pass by someone who needed help. He drove five miles up our side of the freeway until he found the first turnaround, drove back five miles, picked up the man who had run out of gas, went five miles in the wrong direction, turned around again, drove the twenty-five miles back to Evanston, helped the man get gas, and drove him back to his car. Being an impatient teenager, I was more than irritated at the long delay. After we finally got on our way, I asked my dad why would he go so far out of his way to help someone. Surely someone else would have stopped and given that man assistance. My dad simply responded, “What goes around comes around.” After seeing the confused look on my face, he further explained, “I believe that someday maybe you or I will be on the side of the road looking for help, and someone will return the favor.” Being ever the optimist, I replied, “I seriously doubt it.” So today I would like to title my talk “Living a Life of Service and Love: What Goes Around Comes Around.” We’ve heard this saying before in many different forms. The Boy Scout slogan: Do a good turn daily. Pay it back. Do unto others as you would have them do unto you, which is the golden rule. You reap what you sow. These are all well and good, but my dad lived by the mantra “What goes around comes around.” He would help anyone anytime and anywhere. But […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/kirt-r-saville_living-life-service-love-goes-around-comes-around/">Living a Life of Service and Love: What Goes Around Comes Around</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Kirt R. Saville, 1 August 2017 Kirt R. Saville, 1 August 2017 Kirt R. Saville clean 26:40 Kirt R. Saville, 1 August 2017 The Call of the Lord https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/paul-caldarella_the-call-of-the-lord/ Tue, 25 Jul 2017 19:23:21 +0000 http://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=13632 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/paul-caldarella_the-call-of-the-lord/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/paul-caldarella_the-call-of-the-lord/feed/ 0 <p>Good morning, brothers and sisters. I first want to thank the Brigham Young University administration for giving me the opportunity to speak with you today. It is always a pleasure to meet with the Saints. I also commend you for attending and watching these devotionals. When I first began my employment at BYU, a colleague of mine told me that if I attended devotionals, my work at the university would be blessed. I have certainly found that to be true. It is an honor to speak to you today, and I pray that the Holy Spirit will attend to help edify and uplift all of us. Since beginning employment at BYU, one of my greatest fears has been giving a devotional talk. However, when I prayed about the invitation to speak to you, I not only received confirmation to give this talk, but I also received the topic to cover. I thought I would start by telling you a little bit more about myself. I am originally from Rhode Island. I joined the Church as a graduate student in Logan, Utah, and I was fortunate enough to meet my wife, Andrea, while in graduate school. We have two boys: AJ, age twelve, and Andrew, age seven. My family is the love of my life, and I am extremely grateful that the Lord has blessed me with them. I also want to wish you all a happy Pioneer Day. I had not heard of this holiday before ­moving to Utah, but it is a day for which I am grateful. It is so important to remember our ancestors and the sacrifices they made for us. I am from a family of immigrants, so I can relate to the story of the pioneers, who traveled great distances and bore up under hardships seeking a better life. My grandfather Emilio Caldarella immigrated to the United States on the Gerty, a steamship from Pachino, Sicily, on June 28, 1906, at the age of eleven with his fourteen-year-old sister, Maria, and his forty-nine-year-old mother, Concetta. They had just twenty dollars between the three of them when they arrived. The voyage by steamship across the Atlantic took nearly three weeks. They first settled in Lawrence, Massachusetts, and eventually moved to Providence, Rhode Island. As I was preparing this talk, I began to wonder what had led people like my grandfather and the early pioneers to leave their homes and loved ones and travel long distances at great personal expense and sacrifice. As I pondered this question, I began to realize that they had heeded the call of the Lord. How else could they have made those long treks and withstood the hardships that often accompanied those experiences? When we are called of the Lord, we can withstand such challenges. I am a pioneer of sorts in that I am the first and only member of my family so far to join The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. In my devotional talk today, I am […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/paul-caldarella_the-call-of-the-lord/">The Call of the Lord</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Paul Caldarella, 25 July 2017 Paul Caldarella, 25 July 2017 Paul Caldarella clean 29:12 Paul Caldarella, 25 July 2017 Of Dead Cats and Dead People: How Family History Can Save the World https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/amy-harris_how-family-history-can-save-the-world/ Tue, 18 Jul 2017 20:46:03 +0000 http://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=13552 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/amy-harris_how-family-history-can-save-the-world/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/amy-harris_how-family-history-can-save-the-world/feed/ 0 <p>I am going to tell you two stories today: a short one about dead cats and a long one about dead people. Dead Cats First, dead cats. Now, I know you might be tired of so many talks beginning with stories about dead cats, but bear with me. My parents’ views on pets—cats or otherwise—could not have been more different. My mother grew up in a household that didn’t allow animals in the house; my dad grew up in a home where pets, at one point even including a monkey, were allowed inside. Over their sixty-some-odd years of marriage, my parents struck a bit of a compromise about pets in our home. Smaller cage-bound animals such as hamsters, snakes, frogs, toads, and fish were allowed inside, but larger animals such as cats, dogs, and any animal destined to become dinner stayed in the garage, the doghouse, or the chicken coop. Dogs were confined, but cats were free to roam. Well, they were free to roam as long as I didn’t pick them up and dress them in my dolls’ clothing—a fate most of them contemplated with a mixture of trepidation and resignation. When I was very young, we lived on a busy intersection with constant traffic. The combination of this location and the pet policy meant that cats—and there seemed to be an endless parade of them that somehow ended up at our house—rarely died of old age. I liked the cats and mourned their loss, and at some point I began to memorize the names and faces of all the cats who had lived, loved, and then shuffled off their mortal coils at our house. Eventually I was unable to keep all of the memories and names straight, and, concerned, I asked my mom whether all those cats would meet us in heaven and whether they would recognize us and we them. She assured me that they would—that the cats would remember me and I them. Forever. Now, the impact of that story isn’t so much about the cats, but it is about my mother’s assurances that relationships last, much like photographs of the two of us have lasted far beyond the moments they captured. Relationships are durable and meaningful—even beyond death. This idea was central to my childhood. As the youngest of nine children, I arrived after three of my four grandparents, a handful of cousins, and my brother had died. Knowing that death would not forever prevent me from knowing those people was deeply comforting and grounding. In a way, that early understanding about relationships has shaped my professional pursuits. I have spent my entire adult life studying relationships, particularly family relationships, and the power they have—for good or ill—to shape social, economic, religious, political, material, and emotional possibilities and realities. My research focuses mostly on eighteenth-century England. This means I study dead people and what they can teach us. As Thomas W. Laqueur put it: The history . . . of the dead is a history of […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/amy-harris_how-family-history-can-save-the-world/">Of Dead Cats and Dead People: How Family History Can Save the World</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Amy Harris, 18 July 2017 Amy Harris, 18 July 2017 Amy Harris clean 36:45 Women and Education: “A Future Only God Could See for You” https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/eva-witesman_women-education-future-god-see/ Tue, 27 Jun 2017 19:40:21 +0000 http://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=13422 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/eva-witesman_women-education-future-god-see/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/eva-witesman_women-education-future-god-see/feed/ 0 <p>It is wonderful to be here. This is not an opportunity I would have imagined for myself. It is truly a future only God could see for me. I am grateful for a Father in Heaven who knows me—who knows my potential and who wants me to become like Him. I can’t wait to someday see like He does—to know everything and to see the future and not just the past. But for now I will stand like a little girl on my Father’s feet, holding His hands and trusting Him as He guides me through the dance of this life. As His daughter, I hope someday to grow up to be just like Him. I am trying to become more like Him now by learning as much as I can and by working to refine the spiritual gifts He has given me. Daughters of God Revelation given in the book of Joel speaks of the role of women in the latter days when it says that, in preparation for the Second Coming of Christ, I will pour out my spirit upon all flesh; and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, . . .  . . . and upon the handmaids in those days will I pour out my spirit. [Joel 2:28–29] Your daughters shall prophesy! In these last days we are meant to seek and receive spiritual revelation by the power of the Holy Ghost. Like Rebekah, Hannah, Elisabeth, and Mary, women are meant to receive direct spiritual revelation through the gifts of the Spirit. Like Miriam (see Exodus 15:20), Deborah (see Judges 4:4), Huldah (see 2 Kings 22:14; 2 Chronicles 34:22), and Anna (see Luke 2:36), we can develop the spiritual gift of prophecy and refine our ability to communicate with our Father in Heaven in ways that affect our own spiritual development and have a positive impact on the world around us.1 These spiritual gifts bring us closer to the image of God, in which we were created. Through her choice to partake of the tree of knowledge in the Garden of Eden, Mother Eve made it possible for each of us to exercise our agency in a world filled with choices, thereby providing a way for us to spiritually develop. I do not think it was an accident that by knowledge she opened a pathway that would allow us to become more like God. I believe this sets an eternal pattern. “The glory of God is intelligence” (D&C 93:36), and we must likewise enhance our own inherent intelligence in order to become like Him and receive His ­spiritual gifts. How do we reach this divine potential? How do we strengthen these spiritual gifts that have been foretold? Eliza R. Snow wrote, “Let them seek for wisdom instead of power and they will have all the power they have wisdom to exercise.”2 An Expansive View When God prepares a leader for the gift of prophecy, He expands their view; He does not narrow it. He provides context for the leader’s personal prophetic development through […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/eva-witesman_women-education-future-god-see/">Women and Education: “A Future Only God Could See for You”</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Eva Witesman, 27 June 2017 Eva Witesman, 27 June 2017 Eva Witesman clean 26:51 Language Learning: A Truly Educational Experience https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/ray-t-clifford_language-learning-truly-educational-experience/ Tue, 13 Jun 2017 20:14:11 +0000 http://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=13291 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/ray-t-clifford_language-learning-truly-educational-experience/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/ray-t-clifford_language-learning-truly-educational-experience/feed/ 0 <p>Internationally, BYU is known as “the language university.” The 2017 edition of the pamphlet Y Facts reported that approximately 65 percent of BYU students speak more than one language. Let me do a quick survey to see if those assembled here today are representative of BYU students in general. If you know more than one language, please raise your hand. [The majority of the audience raised their hand.] I hope you realize how extraordinary it is that you have been given the gift of being able to communicate in more than one language. Think about it: language is the most complex of all human behaviors, and most of you can communicate in more than one language. The Complexity of Language Since we can all read English, I would like to demonstrate the complexity of language by giving you a simple English test. How would you read “St. Paul St.” aloud? You probably said, “Saint Paul Street.” And your response to this simple task was likely not only correct but automatic. But can you explain to another person the rule for determining what the abbreviation “St.” stands for? Perhaps you would say that “St.” before a noun is an abbreviation for “saint,” and “St.” after a noun is an abbreviation for “street.” Now test your rule on the following street sign, which I saw near Disneyland in California: “St. College St.” Oops, there is no saint named College! However, there is a state college, so we will have to refine our rule for pronouncing the abbreviation “St.” Yes, even simple language is complex. Language is so complex that we are often hard pressed to explain how it operates. Yet we are generally unaware of how complex language is. In some ways language is like the air we breathe: we don’t pay attention to it—unless there is something wrong with it. Because people don’t pay attention to language unless there is something wrong with it, you should not take compliments about your language skills too seriously. The fact that someone complimented you on your language is an indication that they noticed it—and that happens when there is something wrong with it. Early in my mission in Austria, I was quite confident of my German language ability. In fact, several members had told me how well I spoke German. Then one Sunday after I said a prayer in sacrament meeting, I overheard some members commenting on my language skills. One sister offered the critique, “War das nicht lieb? Genau wie ein kleines Kind!” Which means, “Wasn’t that sweet? Just like a little child!” The sister who made the comment was too kind to ever provide that honest feedback to me personally, so I was grateful that I had overheard the comment she had made to others. Her candid assessment let me know that I needed to improve my language skills. Another mission experience taught me how complicated it is to translate a concept from one language to another. One of the best interpreters I have […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/ray-t-clifford_language-learning-truly-educational-experience/">Language Learning: A Truly Educational Experience</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Ray T. Clifford, 13 June 2017 Ray T. Clifford, 13 June 2017 Ray T. Clifford clean 26:38 On Change and Becoming: Thoughts from a Reluctant Grower https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/diane-thueson-reich_i-am-a-reluctant-grower/ Tue, 06 Jun 2017 20:52:59 +0000 http://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=13222 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/diane-thueson-reich_i-am-a-reluctant-grower/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/diane-thueson-reich_i-am-a-reluctant-grower/feed/ 0 <p>At some point after my first couple of years at BYU, a brother in my ward, who was retired from the BYU religion faculty, said, “Hey, you could speak at a devotional!” I don’t know why he thought I might be qualified for that, but I shrugged it off, thinking that if I sang often enough, I would surely be exempt from speaking. Just recently I had the thought that since I have been at BYU for ten years, I might need to lay low to dodge the devotional bullet. However, six weeks ago I received an email from Vice President Matt Richardson asking if I would be willing to speak at this devotional. I reluctantly replied that I would accept the challenge, though I am not sure that “happily” would describe my attitude. As I prayed for guidance on a topic, this thought came to me: “I am a reluctant grower.” I had never used that term before, though it seemed to suit me well, so I can only guess that the Spirit had coined that phrase just for me. Needing clarification on that phrase, I went to Google for a precise definition of reluctant. It said that reluctant is an adjective that means “unwilling and hesitant; disinclined.” Its synonyms include being “loath to, unwilling to, disinclined to, indisposed to; not in favor of, against, opposed to.” It’s antonyms include being “willing” and “eager.” The word reluctant originated in the mid-seventeenth century from the Latin word reluctant, which means “struggling against,” and from the verb reluctari: the prefix re- means “expressing intensive force” and the suffix luctari means “to struggle.” As a side note, the word ­reluctant is worth eleven points in Scrabble. Am I, as this definition says, unwilling, hesitant, and even disinclined to grow? I will refer to myself, since I am confessing that I am a reluctant grower, but feel free to insert your name where applicable. Am I Reluctant? What is it that sometimes makes me hesitant to face a growing opportunity? I am not against hard work. I bore both of my children while pursuing a doctorate, working two jobs, singing operas on the main stage at Indiana University (one of the top music schools in the country), and maintaining a 3.9 GPA. No, I am not opposed to hard work. Is it that I am not wanting to participate in activities? I am more than willing to fulfill my callings, go visiting teaching, take a dinner—that likely my good husband expertly cooked—to another family, or participate in my ward’s day of service. No, I am willing to do things that are asked of me. Am I afraid of the process of growing? Many times while sitting in Relief Society I will hear a sister say, “I prayed for patience” or “I prayed for charity.” I think, “Are you crazy?! Do you not know what challenges come when you pray for Christlike attributes?” They then proceed to tell of the tragic circumstances that occurred to […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/diane-thueson-reich_i-am-a-reluctant-grower/">On Change and Becoming: Thoughts from a Reluctant Grower</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Diane Thueson Reich, 6 June 2017 Diane Thueson Reich, 6 June 2017 Diane Thueson Reich clean 21:59 B-Y-You Matter to Him https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/keith-j-wilson_b-y-matter/ Tue, 23 May 2017 19:25:25 +0000 http://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=13129 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/keith-j-wilson_b-y-matter/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/keith-j-wilson_b-y-matter/feed/ 0 <p>Six years ago President Dieter F. Uchtdorf gave a profound conference talk entitled “You Matter to Him.”1 In his talk he explained that God is the Creator of all things and yet is concerned about each one of us individually. Today I would like to build upon President Uchtdorf’s topic and title my remarks “BYU Matters to Him.” However, I would like to redefine the acronym for Brigham Young University as B-Y-You, as in you (y-o-u). Thus the title of my address is “B-Y-You Matter to Him.” This past semester one of my students submitted the following account. With her permission, I share her tender feelings about when she first arrived at BYU: Leaving everything you have known for the entirety of your life to attend a university that is 547 miles away is difficult. You can no longer lean on the support of your family and friends; you can no longer enjoy the safety and security of your home; you can no longer simply follow your parents. Your life is in your own hands, and it is terrifying. I distinctly remember the hurricane of emotions I experienced as I bid farewell to my dad as he drove away, leaving me standing outside my dorm with five people I had never met. I had to make my own food, and I felt sorely unprepared. Actually, I felt more than unprepared—I felt absolutely and entirely lost. My student then went on to describe her feelings that day as those of “ultimate vulnerability.”2 As I pondered my student’s feelings of vulnerability and isolation, I felt a personal surge of déjà vu from when I first arrived at BYU some forty-seven years ago. My student’s account stirred within me some tender and painful emotions from decades past. I suspect that many of you here today can also recall the daunting memories of when you first arrived on this campus. As I address you today, perhaps some of you find yourself in the throes of similar feelings of trepidation or of being lost. The Greatness of BYU I do not mean to minimize these feelings of loneliness or intimidation, but they present a marked contrast to the feelings we first had when we were accepted to BYU. Consider the following glossy accolades and advantages of attending Brigham Young University. BYU consistently ranks in the top 25 percent of national universities.3 BYU is in the top five of the best value universities4 and costs around $30,000 less per year than other private schools.5 Consequently, BYU students graduate with substantially less debt.6 BYU is the number-one stone-cold sober university,7 and students will never have to tolerate drunk classmates or professors. Also, BYU has launched more of its ­students into PhD programs than Harvard, Yale, or Stanford.8 Upon arrival, every student here has a church unit waiting to receive and support them. Additionally, more than 60 percent of the students at BYU are returned missionaries.9 And please don’t forget that BYU has been rated number one in the […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/keith-j-wilson_b-y-matter/">B-Y-You Matter to Him</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Keith J. Wilson, 23 May 2017 Keith J. Wilson, 23 May 2017 Keith J. Wilson clean 26:03 The Experience of Love and the Limitations of Psychological Explanation https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/brent-d-slife_experience-love-limitations-psychological-explanation/ Tue, 16 May 2017 18:38:06 +0000 http://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=13076 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/brent-d-slife_experience-love-limitations-psychological-explanation/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/brent-d-slife_experience-love-limitations-psychological-explanation/feed/ 0 <p>It may not surprise you, but I want to declare at the outset that I have been multiply blessed. I want to initially mention an important blessing—this university—and then I would like to dwell on a forty-one-year blessing—my marriage. Those who have received this award in past years have stood here to express their gratitude to BYU, but I feel especially blessed in receiving this award as a non-Mormon. This university has insisted on valuing me regardless of my religious minority status. I am a religious “other,” yet this university has not only accepted me as a colleague and a friend but also persisted in recognizing me and celebrating my work. I think this is a sort of minor miracle. As you will see in the case of my wife, I honestly believe that when we truly value and even love those who are “other” in some way, God is there.1 I also want to acknowledge how important this university has been to my academic work. I have long desired to actively interface the sacred and the secular—the sacredness of my faith and the secularity of my discipline of psychology—but there are few places that permit this work. BYU, however, has not only welcomed this type of scholarship but also encouraged and facilitated it. For this reason, I have never had to compartmentalize my Christianity away from my discipline; I have been able to integrate the two—which has been an incredible blessing to me! As I mentioned, however, the blessing I want to dwell on today is the love I feel for my wife. But discussing such a personal experience may seem a bit strange for a psychologist. Psychologists are supposed to deal with objective data.2 Unfortunately, love isn’t objective, so psychology’s knowledge of love has been meager over the years. Consider renowned love researcher Harry Harlow and his lament in his presidential address to the American Psychological Association: So far as love or affection is concerned, psychologists have failed in this mission. The little we know about love does not transcend simple observation, and the little we write about it has been written better by poets and novelists.3 This conclusion was stated many years ago, but it is not unusual for even modern investigators of love to echo Harlow’s lament. Zick Rubin, for example, believes that some progress has been made, but he comments that love has “seemed safely beyond the research scientist’s ever-­extending grasp.”4 I won’t get into psychological methods here. Suffice it to say that a relatively new brand of psychological method—qualitative ­investigation—was specifically set up to study subjective experiences. And qualitative investigators are not afraid of even just one person’s experiences, especially when those personal experiences teach us something about the phenomenon of interest. As a marital therapist of thirty-five years, I have long realized the great blessing of my love for Karen. I know that everyone is supposed to love their spouse, but I don’t just love my wife; I am still in love with […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/brent-d-slife_experience-love-limitations-psychological-explanation/">The Experience of Love and the Limitations of Psychological Explanation</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Brent D. Slife, 16 May 2017 Brent D. Slife, 16 May 2017 Brent D. Slife clean 36:22 “Lay Hold upon the Word”: The Power of Wholehearted Living https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/mckay-christensen_lay-hold-upon-word/ Tue, 09 May 2017 19:20:54 +0000 http://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=12966 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/mckay-christensen_lay-hold-upon-word/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/mckay-christensen_lay-hold-upon-word/feed/ 0 <p>When I was fifteen years old, I worked on a sod farm located close to where the Payson Utah Temple now stands. To cut the sod, we used a harvester that weighed about fourteen tons. One day I was assigned to work with my high school classmate on the back of the harvester. We were moving the harvester from one end of the field to another. I was walking alongside the slow-moving harvester, and I attempted to jump up onto the platform to sit next to my friend. I misjudged my jump and landed only partway on the platform. I lost my balance and fell in front of the double set of dual wheels underneath the platform. I immediately tried to scurry out of the path of the wheels, but the big, knobby tires caught my high-top sneakers, and the wheels started to roll up my leg, throwing me to the ground. I quickly realized I was in quite a predicament. I was now lying feet first directly in the path of the wheels that were going to roll over the entire length of my body, starting with my feet and ending with my head. I felt my right leg break under the immense weight. The wheels continued to roll, crushing my pelvis. I have never felt anything so excruciatingly painful in my life. My back and ribs were the next to break in multiple places as the wheels climbed up my stomach and chest. Then the machine mercilessly twisted me onto my back, with the knobby treads passing over my shoulder and the side of my face and neck, miraculously missing most of my head. By the time the fourteen tons finished their devastating work, I had lost consciousness. The first thing I remember when I opened my eyes was the inconceivable pain. I couldn’t breathe. It felt like I was underwater. I was trying to breathe, but things weren’t working the way they were supposed to work. I couldn’t speak. I couldn’t cry out, even though I frantically wanted to cry for help. Everything hurt. I quickly grasped the fact that I was about to die. Honestly, the pain was so extreme that I wanted to die. I just wanted it to stop. I later learned that I had suffered a traumatic pneumothorax, or, in simple terms, my lungs had collapsed. If there is a puncture in your lung due to trauma, the air escapes from the lung to the area outside of your lungs inside the chest ­cavity. As a result, your lungs push together like a wet paper sack. The air inside your chest cavity is unable to escape, and the pressure keeps the lungs from expanding. This can lead to cardiac arrest or respiratory failure. Everything in my body was screaming for oxygen. In my desperation to breathe, I had to expand my chest cavity to gather air. The pain of my broken ribs and back from even the slightest movement was more than I could possibly endure. In […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/mckay-christensen_lay-hold-upon-word/">“Lay Hold upon the Word”: The Power of Wholehearted Living</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> McKay Christensen, 9 May 2017 McKay Christensen, 9 May 2017 McKay Christensen clean 27:13 Testimony and Other “Wicked” Problems https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/eric-gillett_testimony-wicked-problems/ Tue, 11 Apr 2017 17:09:14 +0000 http://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=12723 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/eric-gillett_testimony-wicked-problems/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/eric-gillett_testimony-wicked-problems/feed/ 0 <p>In recent years there have been glowing, breathless reports appearing in the media that speak of a new approach to problem solving. This method promises a competitive edge for businesses, organizations, and governments alike. Innovation consultants use the approach to tease out new ideas, collecting hefty fees in the process. Time magazine, Harvard Business Review, and a new binge-worthy Netflix series all extol its virtues.1 In the corporate boardroom, the CDO, or the chief design officer, has joined the ranks of the CEO and the CFO. Design-driven companies like Apple, Nike, and Target consistently outperform their competitors.2 It seems that “design thinking,” as it is known, is all the rage. Corporate profits alone, however, cannot explain all the new interest in design thinking. In 1973 a German design theorist introduced the concept of a “wicked problem.”3 Contrary to what you might expect by the name, a wicked problem does not refer to something evil or sinister but instead describes something so tricky and complicated that it seems to defy solution. With a wicked problem, the situation is dynamic and often involves multiple variables. Both the exact nature of the problem and the solutions remain unknown when the project begins. Examples of wicked problems might include climate change, poverty, the Syrian civil war, or American healthcare, to name a few. For these problems there are no easy answers, no silver bullets. When other approaches fail, design thinking offers a fairly reliable process for solving wicked problems. It values empathy, understanding, and usability, all part of the human experience. Instead of counting widgets or poring over sales charts, design thinking takes a more anthropological approach, uncovering the human motivations behind complex problems. As I thought about the message I could share with you today, I was reminded that many design principles offer insight into solving some of life’s great challenges. I believe that by applying these principles to your own wicked problems, your chance of solving them may improve. While this morning I have chosen to apply these principles to building a testimony, the methods are transferable to any problem you face in your life that you deem wicked. Before we review these principles, take a moment to think. What is your wicked problem? Maybe it is making your next tuition payment, choosing a new roommate, finding a summer internship, or even getting a date for Saturday night. Perhaps, though, your wicked problem is more complex—maybe it is a bit trickier. You struggle with certain Church doctrines, you doubt your testimony, or you wonder whether you will stay active in the Church after you graduate. My maternal grandparents, Bill and Aleda Shuldberg, faced problems very similar to these. They were about the same age as many of you when they were courting in 1928. Although they did not have the luxury of attending college or know the stress of choosing a major, they both struggled with feelings of resentment toward the Church and toward their very active, devout parents. As a boy, […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/eric-gillett_testimony-wicked-problems/">Testimony and Other “Wicked” Problems</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Eric Gillett, 11 April 2017 Eric Gillett, 11 April 2017 Eric Gillett clean 27:17 Waiting upon the Lord: The Antidote to Uncertainty https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/erin-kramer-holmes_waiting-upon-lord-antidote-uncertainty/ Tue, 04 Apr 2017 21:34:57 +0000 http://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=12610 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/erin-kramer-holmes_waiting-upon-lord-antidote-uncertainty/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/erin-kramer-holmes_waiting-upon-lord-antidote-uncertainty/feed/ 0 <p>I am very grateful for the opportunity I have to speak with you today. I would like to begin with a scripture in Ecclesiastes 9:11: The race is not to the swift, nor the battle to the strong, neither yet bread to the wise, nor yet riches to men of understanding, nor yet favour to men of skill; but time and chance happeneth to them all. [emphasis added] I ponder this scripture each time I have a conversation with someone who didn’t get into the graduate program they applied to, doesn’t know what job to take, came home from their mission early, or has had other unexpected experiences. As I listen to their stories, my mind returns to that scripture and the reality that “time and chance happeneth to [us] all.” Today I would like to explore this scripture with you, but I suggest that another way of talking about time and chance is to use the word uncertainty. Uncertainty as a Core Human Experience Though the sources of your uncertainty will likely differ from mine, I believe this scripture in Ecclesiastes speaks the truth. No one will be immune from uncertainty or from the struggle, questioning, heartache, and pain that may ­accompany it. Uncertainty has many faces. It includes questions, doubts, ambiguity, and the discovery that persons (or things) are not quite what we expected. In essence, uncertainty is a reflection of the gap between our desire for the ideal and our experience of reality. The ideal represents how we think things ought to or should be; reality is how things actually are. Though we live our lives in the real world, our dreams and goals are often reflected in ideals. When we experience “a gap between the ideal and the real,”1 we experience uncertainty. In some of my research I have studied this gap for women transitioning to parenthood. My colleagues and I have focused our attention on what new mothers thought their ideal work situations would be versus what their real work situations were. We defined work situations broadly, including opportunities to stay home, to combine work and family, or to combine school and family. The majority of the mothers in our sample (more than 70 percent) experienced a gap between what they believed to be ideal and what their actual work and family situation was.2 I tell you this to exemplify the claim in Ecclesiastes that “chance happeneth to them all.” Uncertainty Challenges Us My colleagues and I also discovered that the greater the gap, the higher the likelihood that a mother would experience depression. I think this finding reflects something else about uncertainty: gaps between our ideals and our real circumstances challenge us. When reality hits or when things don’t go as planned, we may struggle. About two and a half years ago, after many years of hoping another child would come to our family, my husband and I discovered we were pregnant. Even our children had been hoping we would have another baby. They had been praying […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/erin-kramer-holmes_waiting-upon-lord-antidote-uncertainty/">Waiting upon the Lord: The Antidote to Uncertainty</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Erin Kramer Holmes, 4 April 2017 Erin Kramer Holmes, 4 April 2017 Erin Kramer Holmes clean 33:27 Real Causes and Real Effects https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/keith-vorkink_real-causes-real-effects/ Tue, 28 Mar 2017 18:16:21 +0000 http://speeches-beta.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=12537 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/keith-vorkink_real-causes-real-effects/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/keith-vorkink_real-causes-real-effects/feed/ 0 <p>I am grateful and humbled to be with you today. As I was preparing for my talk, I was reminded of a story I once heard in a stake conference session a number of years ago. The story begins with a rancher performing chores out on his ranch one morning when he sees a shiny pickup truck drive onto his ranch and park. Out of the truck steps a man in uniform who walks up to the rancher and states, “I’m here to inspect your ranch for any illegally grown drugs.” The rancher responds, “Fine, but do not go in that field over there,” and points to a beautiful field to the east. The officer replies, “Mister, I don’t think you understand me. I am here to inspect your ranch, and I have the authority of the federal government behind me.” Reaching into his pocket he pulls out some form of a badge and proudly displays the badge to the rancher. “See this badge, old man? This badge means I am allowed to go on any land,” he says, pointing all across the farmer’s ranch. “Have I made myself clear?” The rancher apologizes, nods, and goes about his chores. A short while later the old rancher hears someone screaming, looks up, and sees the officer running while being chased by a large bull in the field that the rancher had told the officer not to enter. With every step the officer takes, the bull takes two. With the distance shrinking between the charging bull and the frantic officer, the rancher steps up onto the fence enclosing the field and yells, “Your badge—show him your badge!” On college campuses everywhere, including this one, we do a fair amount of badge showing—and for good reason. Our faculty have gone to top graduate schools and have trained with many of the best scholars, which, among other benefits, has helped prepare them to stand at the front of their classrooms and speak with expertise and authority. Unfortunately I have no badge to pull from my pocket demonstrating my credentials to speak today. I am grateful for the vote of confidence from President Worthen and Vice President Richardson in extending this invitation. I am also grateful to each of you for coming to today’s devotional. It is not lost on me that you have the choice to attend or not. To this end, I hope and pray for the presence of the Spirit and that we may be edified as a result. I am grateful for my wife, Marcie, and for my children, all of whom are here except for our oldest daughter, Sarah, who is serving a mission in South Carolina and happens to return from her mission next week; we are excited at our house. I am grateful for my mother, other family members, and dear friends and colleagues who are here today as well. Rafting Gone Awry I had the good fortune of growing up in the state of Alaska. It was a fantastic […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/keith-vorkink_real-causes-real-effects/">Real Causes and Real Effects</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Keith Vorkink, 28 March 2017 Keith Vorkink, 28 March 2017 Keith Vorkink clean 28:19 The Rock of Our Redeemer https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/weatherford-t-clayton_the-rock-of-our-redeemer/ Tue, 14 Mar 2017 22:55:05 +0000 http://speeches-beta.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=12325 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/weatherford-t-clayton_the-rock-of-our-redeemer/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/weatherford-t-clayton_the-rock-of-our-redeemer/feed/ 0 <p>During our mission in Canada, my wife and I gave a “last instruction” to departing missionaries the day before they went home. Each of these young elders and sisters were heroes to us, and we wanted their transition home to be very, very successful. Our instruction was given with love and good fun. I particularly enjoyed instructing on dating and marriage. One afternoon as I stood at the blackboard during a last instruction, the Spirit pressed Helaman 5:12 deeply into my mind. This scripture came from what could have been the Book of Mormon prophet Helaman’s “last instruction” to his sons prior to their departure for their magnificent mission to the Nephites and the Lamanites. We all quoted the scripture together: And now, my sons, remember, remember that it is upon the rock of our Redeemer, who is Christ, the Son of God, that ye must build your foundation; that when the devil shall send forth his mighty winds, yea, his shafts in the whirlwind, yea, when all his hail and his mighty storm shall beat upon you, it shall have no power over you to drag you down to the gulf of misery and endless wo, because of the rock upon which ye are built, which is a sure foundation, a foundation whereon if men build they cannot fall. What a magnificent verse of scripture. Think of it: Helaman promised us that if we build our foundation upon our Savior, we cannot fall, regardless of what Satan throws at us. What a powerful promise! Our Savior gave the same promise in the Sermon on the Mount: Whoso heareth these sayings of mine and doeth them, I will liken . . . unto a wise man, who built his house upon a rock— And the rain descended, and the floods came, and the winds blew, and beat upon that house; and it fell not, for it was founded upon a rock.1 I bet a lot of you Primary graduates are thinking of a song. Would you sing it with me—just the first two verses, with hand motions? The wise man built his house upon the rock, The wise man built his house upon the rock, The wise man built his house upon the rock, And the rains came tumbling down. The rains came down, and the floods came up, The rains came down, and the floods came up, The rains came down, and the floods came up, And the house on the rock stood still.2 Thank you! Doesn’t this simple song teach a powerful lesson? Luke put it slightly differently: Whosoever cometh to me, and heareth my sayings, and doeth them . . . . . . is like a man which built an house, and digged deep, and laid the foundation on a rock: and when the flood arose, the stream beat vehemently upon that house, and could not shake it: for it was founded upon a rock.3 When a person comes to Heavenly Father and Jesus Christ and hears Their words and lives by them, […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/weatherford-t-clayton_the-rock-of-our-redeemer/">The Rock of Our Redeemer</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Weatherford T. Clayton, 14 March 2017 Weatherford T. Clayton, 14 March 2017 Weatherford T. Clayton clean 27:28 Where Do We Go from Here? Chaos or Community https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/clayborne-carson_go-chaos-community/ Tue, 28 Feb 2017 19:37:49 +0000 http://speeches-beta.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=12106 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/clayborne-carson_go-chaos-community/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/clayborne-carson_go-chaos-community/feed/ 0 <p>The text for this forum is currently unavailable, but please enjoy the audio through the link provided.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/clayborne-carson_go-chaos-community/">Where Do We Go from Here? Chaos or Community</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Clayborne Carson, 28 February 2017 Clayborne Carson, 28 February 2017 Clayborne Carson clean 41:21 On Failing and Finishing—Cassy Budd, Feb 2017 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/cassy-budd_on-failure-and-finishing/ Tue, 14 Feb 2017 23:04:35 +0000 http://speeches-beta.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=11909 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/cassy-budd_on-failure-and-finishing/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/cassy-budd_on-failure-and-finishing/feed/ 0 <p>Play Through Your Mistakes Music has always been a very important part of my life. Nearly every major memory of my childhood involves music of some kind: singing with my family on road trips to pass the time; learning barbershop music with my mom and sisters; listening to the Tijuana Brass band on the record player while decorating our Christmas tree; singing my father’s favorite song, “Love at Home” (see Hymns, 2002, no. 294), for family home evening; and admiring my mother as she played the organ in our sacrament meeting every week—something she still does at the young age of eighty. Given that music played such a prominent role in my youth, it will not surprise you to know that I took piano lessons for ten years, from the age of eight to seventeen. My first piano teacher—we will call her Mrs. Smith—was very strict and had high expectations for mastery. During my lesson she would often follow the music with a pencil as I played. Sometimes, after I hit a sour note or used the wrong fingering, Mrs. Smith would flick my fingers with that pencil. She intended to help me recognize the mistake so that I could correct it. Unfortunately, after several experiences with the dreaded pencil, I learned that the least painful way to handle my musical mistakes was to remove my hands from the keys as quickly as possible. This habit of abruptly stopping after a mistake was also unintentionally reinforced when I would practice at home. Our piano was positioned on a wall that was opposite our kitchen; in fact, it was back-to-back with our stove. I would often practice while my mother was making dinner on the other side of the wall. When I would make a mistake, she would make a staccato “ah” sound. Startled, my hands would fly from the keys. I know this was not the intended outcome because I heard her do the same thing when she made her own mistakes at the organ or piano. She still does this today, but only in practice. When she is at the organ or piano for performance, there are few errors, but when they occur, they are hardly noticeable. She can play right on through a mistake like nothing happened. I, on the other hand, cannot. Most of my piano recitals with Mrs. Smith took place in the chapel of my home ward building. These were reverent occasions—no clapping after the end of each performance, just polite smiles from the audience as we each took our turn at the grand piano. We were not allowed to use our music, so for me, the walk up those three velvety red steps to the piano felt like walking into a battle unarmed. I was terrified that I would make a mistake, take my hands from the keys, and be unable to find the right placement again. This terror of performing would follow me into adulthood. When I was still in the early years of my […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/cassy-budd_on-failure-and-finishing/">On Failing and Finishing</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Cassy Budd, 14 February 2017 Play Through Your Mistakes Music has always been a very important part of my life. Nearly every major memory of my childhood involves music of some kind: singing with my family on road trips to pass the time; learning barbershop music with my mom and sisters; listening to the Tijuana Brass band on the record player while decorating our Christmas tree; singing my father’s favorite song, “Love at Home” (see Hymns, 2002, no. 294), for family home evening; and admiring my mother as she played the organ in our sacrament meeting every week—something she still does at the young age of eighty. Given that music played such a prominent role in my youth, it will not surprise you to know that I took piano lessons for ten years, from the age of eight to seventeen. My first piano teacher—we will call her Mrs. Smith—was very strict and had high expectations for mastery. During my lesson she would often follow the music with a pencil as I played. Sometimes, after I hit a sour note or used the wrong fingering, Mrs. Smith would flick my fingers with that pencil. She intended to help me recognize the mistake so that I could correct it. Unfortunately, after several experiences with the dreaded pencil, I learned that the least painful way to handle my musical mistakes was to remove my hands from the keys as quickly as possible. This habit of abruptly stopping after a mistake was also unintentionally reinforced when I would practice at home. Our piano was positioned on a wall that was opposite our kitchen; in fact, it was back-to-back with our stove. I would often practice while my mother was making dinner on the other side of the wall. When I would make a mistake, she would make a staccato “ah” sound. Startled, my hands would fly from the keys. I know this was not the intended outcome because I heard her do the same thing when she made her own mistakes at the organ or piano. She still does this today, but only in practice. When she is at the organ or piano for performance, there are few errors, but when they occur, they are hardly noticeable. She can play right on through a mistake like nothing happened. I, on the other hand, cannot. Most of my piano recitals with Mrs. Smith took place in the chapel of my home ward building. These were reverent occasions—no clapping after the end of each performance, just polite smiles from the audience as we each took our turn at the grand piano. We were not allowed to use our music, so for me, the walk up those three velvety red steps to the piano felt like walking into a battle unarmed. I was terrified that I would make a mistake, take my hands from the keys, and be unable to find the right placement again. This terror of performing would follow me into adulthood. When I was still in the early years of my […] Christinah Mulder clean 27:54 A Banquet of Consequences: The Cumulative Result of All Choices—Quentin L. Cook, Feb 2017 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/quentin-l-cook_banquet-consequences-cumulative-result-choices/ Tue, 07 Feb 2017 22:11:00 +0000 http://speeches-beta.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=11753 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/quentin-l-cook_banquet-consequences-cumulative-result-choices/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/quentin-l-cook_banquet-consequences-cumulative-result-choices/feed/ 0 <p>One of the most cunning aspects of the adversary’s efforts to thwart our Father in Heaven’s plan of happiness is his deceitful teaching that there is no evil influence or devil1 and his attempt to redefine evil as good and good as evil, darkness as light and light as darkness, and bitter as sweet and sweet as bitter!2 This is sometimes called a paradigm shift—or “when the usual way of thinking about or doing something is replaced by a new and different way,”3 thus portraying things to be exactly the opposite of what they really are. In his classic novel The Screwtape Letters, C. S. Lewis wrote from a senior devil’s point of view. Lewis inverted traditional values using irony and satire to make evil appear good and good appear evil.4 In this vein I had a provocative meeting with an internationally recognized advertising expert a few months ago. He is an unusually gifted and creative thinker. We were discussing the influence of evil and the consequences of bad choices. He envisioned an interesting hypothetical account of the adversary (Lucifer) meeting with an advertising agency. The adversary described his dilemma: He and his followers had rebelled and rejected the Father’s plan and had come to understand they could not prevail against God. Lucifer understood that while the Father’s plan was about joy and happiness, his own plan was resulting in grief and misery. The problem, Lucifer explained to the ad executive, was how to attract followers. After contemplating this problem, it was determined that Lucifer’s only hope of success was to achieve a paradigm shift or values inversion—in other words, to characterize the Father’s plan as resulting in grief and misery and Lucifer’s plan as resulting in joy and happiness. While this contemplated meeting with an advertising agency is hypothetical, it serves a useful purpose. The truth is, not only do the enemies of Father’s plan attempt to undermine the doctrine and principles of the plan, but they also attempt to mischaracterize the blessings that flow from the plan. Their basic effort is to make that which is good, righteous, and joyful seem utterly miserable. I will discuss some of the adversary’s efforts to mischaracterize and undermine the blessings of living according to the Father’s plan. Word of Wisdom My first example is the Word of Wisdom. I fully recognize that you magnificent students understand the importance of the Word of Wisdom and have agreed, on your honor, to live by it. However, over the course of a lifetime I have seen many of my friends’ lives blighted and sometimes destroyed by alcohol. An alcohol culture isn’t just about Church doctrine; it is about the health and happiness of everyone. You can be an important voice in educating society about the consequences of this issue. In the Father’s plan, the Word of Wisdom—section 89 of the Doctrine and Covenants, given because of “evils and designs . . . of conspiring men”—provides health principles. It is “adapted to the capacity of the weak and […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/quentin-l-cook_banquet-consequences-cumulative-result-choices/">A Banquet of Consequences: The Cumulative Result of All Choices</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Quentin L. Cook, 7 February 2017 Quentin L. Cook, 7 February 2017 Quentin L. Cook clean 26:22 The Power of Your Words—Craig L. Manning, Jan 2017 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/craig-manning_power-words/ Tue, 31 Jan 2017 20:06:25 +0000 http://speeches-beta.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=11723 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/craig-manning_power-words/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/craig-manning_power-words/feed/ 0 <p>"Faith," said the Prophet Joseph Smith, "works by words." Replacing self-doubt with power words can remove fear and increase performance in your life.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/craig-manning_power-words/">The Power of Your Words</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Craig L. Manning, 31 January 2017 "Faith," said the Prophet Joseph Smith, "works by words." Replacing self-doubt with power words can remove fear and increase performance in your life. Craig L. Manning clean 20:26 The Doctrine of Christ: Our Daily Walk—Douglas D. Holmes, Jan 2017 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/douglas-d-holmes_doctrine-christ-daily-walk/ Tue, 17 Jan 2017 18:22:41 +0000 http://speeches-alpha.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=11572 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/douglas-d-holmes_doctrine-christ-daily-walk/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/douglas-d-holmes_doctrine-christ-daily-walk/feed/ 0 <p>The doctrine of Christ is simple, yet beautiful. Faith, repentance, ordinances, and the Holy Ghost should be part of our daily lives.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/douglas-d-holmes_doctrine-christ-daily-walk/">The Doctrine of Christ: Our Daily Walk</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Douglas D. Holmes, 17 January 2017 The doctrine of Christ is simple, yet beautiful. Faith, repentance, ordinances, and the Holy Ghost should be part of our daily lives. Douglas D. Holmes clean 30:58 “The Pursuit of All Truth”—Kevin J. Worthen, Jan 2017 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/kevin-j-worthen_truth-3/ Tue, 10 Jan 2017 20:06:35 +0000 http://speeches-alpha.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=11391 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/kevin-j-worthen_truth-3/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/kevin-j-worthen_truth-3/feed/ 0 <p>In a world that has been described as "post-truth," this message declares that truth does exist, it does matter, and we can discern it.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/kevin-j-worthen_truth-3/">The Pursuit of All Truth</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Kevin J Worthen, 10 January 2017 In a world that has been described as "post-truth," this message declares that truth does exist, it does matter, and we can discern it. Kevin J Worthen clean 21:04 A Safe Place—Peggy S. Worthen, Jan 2017 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/peggy-s-worthen_a-safe-place/ Tue, 10 Jan 2017 17:44:24 +0000 http://speeches-alpha.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=11569 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/peggy-s-worthen_a-safe-place/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/peggy-s-worthen_a-safe-place/feed/ 0 <p>Communication is the key to all successful relationships. Learn to listen and to create a safe place for conversation by being considerate of others.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/peggy-s-worthen_a-safe-place/">A Safe Place</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Peggy S. Worthen, 10 January 2017 Communication is the key to all successful relationships. Learn to listen and to create a safe place for conversation by being considerate of others. Peggy S. Worthen clean 11:38 Lessons from Joseph Smith—Bonnie L. Oscarson, Dec 2016 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/bonnie-l-oscarson_lessons-joseph-smith/ Tue, 06 Dec 2016 18:41:22 +0000 http://speeches-alpha.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=11349 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/bonnie-l-oscarson_lessons-joseph-smith/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/bonnie-l-oscarson_lessons-joseph-smith/feed/ 0 <p>Joseph Smith's life teaches us about reaching our potential, standing up to criticism, and more. A testimony of this prophet brings us closer to the Savior.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/bonnie-l-oscarson_lessons-joseph-smith/">Lessons from Joseph Smith</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Bonnie L. Oscarson, 6 December 2016 Joseph Smith's life teaches us about reaching our potential, standing up to criticism, and more. A testimony of this prophet brings us closer to the Savior. Bonnie L. Oscarson clean 24:25 Listen, Lift, Rescue—Jodi Maxfield, Nov 2016 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/jodi-maxfield_listen-lift-rescue-2/ Tue, 29 Nov 2016 22:57:58 +0000 http://speeches-alpha.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=11389 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/jodi-maxfield_listen-lift-rescue-2/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/jodi-maxfield_listen-lift-rescue-2/feed/ 0 <p>If we are willing to listen, we can become instruments in the Lord's hands to lift and rescue others through an act of kindness or by sharing our talents.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/jodi-maxfield_listen-lift-rescue-2/">Listen, Lift, Rescue</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Jodi Maxfield, 29 November 2016 If we are willing to listen, we can become instruments in the Lord's hands to lift and rescue others through an act of kindness or by sharing our talents. Jodi Maxfield clean 31:32 The Book of Mormon: Man-Made or God-Given? https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/tad-r-callister_book-mormon-man-made-god-given/ Tue, 01 Nov 2016 22:01:56 +0000 http://speeches-alpha.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=11278 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/tad-r-callister_book-mormon-man-made-god-given/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/tad-r-callister_book-mormon-man-made-god-given/feed/ 0 <p>The Book of Mormon Is the Keystone of Our Religion It is good to be with you today. I love BYU. It is where I attended school, where I met my wonderful wife, and where all six of our children have attended. The title of my talk today is “The Book of Mormon: Man-Made or God-Given?”1 Because the Book of Mormon is “the keystone of our religion,” as described by Joseph Smith,2 the Church rises or falls on the truth of it. As a result, if the Book of Mormon can be proved to be man-made, then the Church is man-made. On the other hand, if its origin is God-given, then Joseph Smith was a prophet, and if he was a prophet, then The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is true. It is that simple. Once we have a foundational testimony of the Book of Mormon, then any question or challenge we confront in life, however difficult it may seem, can be approached with faith, not doubt. Why? Because the keystone of our religion—the Book of Mormon and its witness of Jesus Christ—has also become the keystone of our testimony, which keystone holds our testimony securely in place. Thus the Book of Mormon has become the focal point of attack by many of our critics: disprove the Book of Mormon and you disprove the Church and undermine testimonies. But this is no easy task—in fact, it is impossible, because the Book of Mormon is true. Eleven witnesses, in addition to Joseph Smith, saw the gold plates, millions of believers have testified of its truthfulness, and the book is readily available for examination. Critics must either dismiss the Book of Mormon with a sheepish shrug or produce a viable alternative to Joseph Smith’s account; namely, that he translated it by the gift and power of God. What then are those alternative arguments presented by our critics for the origin of the Book of Mormon, and what is the truth? Argument 1: Joseph Smith, Alleged to Be an Ignorant Man, Wrote the Book of Mormon In 1831 a clergyman named Alexander Campbell proposed that Joseph Smith wrote rather than translated the Book of Mormon: There never was a book more evidently written by one set of fingers, nor more certainly conceived in one cranium . . . , than this . . . book. . . . I cannot doubt for a single moment that [Joseph Smith] is the sole author and proprietor of it.3 Campbell also declared that “[Joseph was] as ignorant and as impudent a knave as ever wrote a book.”4 But this assertion that Joseph Smith, who was “ignorant” and lacked education, could write such a work as the Book of Mormon seemed so preposterous to other contemporary critics that they readily dismissed it. Even Campbell himself, who proposed this theory, later abandoned it in favor of another alternative.5 So the early theories about the origin of the Book of Mormon started to focus on the premise that Joseph Smith, an unlearned man, […]</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/tad-r-callister_book-mormon-man-made-god-given/">The Book of Mormon: Man-Made or God-Given?</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Tad R. Callister, 1 November 2016 The Book of Mormon Is the Keystone of Our Religion It is good to be with you today. I love BYU. It is where I attended school, where I met my wonderful wife, and where all six of our children have attended. The title of my talk today is “The Book of Mormon: Man-Made or God-Given?”1 Because the Book of Mormon is “the keystone of our religion,” as described by Joseph Smith,2 the Church rises or falls on the truth of it. As a result, if the Book of Mormon can be proved to be man-made, then the Church is man-made. On the other hand, if its origin is God-given, then Joseph Smith was a prophet, and if he was a prophet, then The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is true. It is that simple. Once we have a foundational testimony of the Book of Mormon, then any question or challenge we confront in life, however difficult it may seem, can be approached with faith, not doubt. Why? Because the keystone of our religion—the Book of Mormon and its witness of Jesus Christ—has also become the keystone of our testimony, which keystone holds our testimony securely in place. Thus the Book of Mormon has become the focal point of attack by many of our critics: disprove the Book of Mormon and you disprove the Church and undermine testimonies. But this is no easy task—in fact, it is impossible, because the Book of Mormon is true. Eleven witnesses, in addition to Joseph Smith, saw the gold plates, millions of believers have testified of its truthfulness, and the book is readily available for examination. Critics must either dismiss the Book of Mormon with a sheepish shrug or produce a viable alternative to Joseph Smith’s account; namely, that he translated it by the gift and power of God. What then are those alternative arguments presented by our critics for the origin of the Book of Mormon, and what is the truth? Argument 1: Joseph Smith, Alleged to Be an Ignorant Man, Wrote the Book of Mormon In 1831 a clergyman named Alexander Campbell proposed that Joseph Smith wrote rather than translated the Book of Mormon: There never was a book more evidently written by one set of fingers, nor more certainly conceived in one cranium . . . , than this . . . book. . . . I cannot doubt for a single moment that [Joseph Smith] is the sole author and proprietor of it.3 Campbell also declared that “[Joseph was] as ignorant and as impudent a knave as ever wrote a book.”4 But this assertion that Joseph Smith, who was “ignorant” and lacked education, could write such a work as the Book of Mormon seemed so preposterous to other contemporary critics that they readily dismissed it. Even Campbell himself, who proposed this theory, later abandoned it in favor of another alternative.5 So the early theories about the origin of the Book of Mormon started to focus on the premise that Joseph Smith, an unlearned man, […] Tad R. Callister clean 32:04 Brigham Young University: A Visionary House—Matthew O. Richards, Oct 2016 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/matthew-o-richardson_brigham-young-university-visionary-house-2/ Tue, 25 Oct 2016 18:34:51 +0000 http://speeches-alpha.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=11385 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/matthew-o-richardson_brigham-young-university-visionary-house-2/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/matthew-o-richardson_brigham-young-university-visionary-house-2/feed/ 0 <p>What do a failed exam, a cut up degree, historical documents, and a screensaver have in common? A vision of ourselves and of BYU to remember and believe in.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/matthew-o-richardson_brigham-young-university-visionary-house-2/">Stand Up Straight, Smile, and Remember Who You Are</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Matthew O. Richardson, 25 October 2016 What do a failed exam, a cut up degree, historical documents, and a screensaver have in common? A vision of ourselves and of BYU to remember and believe in. Matthew O. Richardson clean 37:15 Audacious Faith: Appreciating the Unique Power and Singular Appeal of LDS Doctrine—Brett G. Scharffs, Oct 2016 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/brett-g-scharffs_audacious-faith-appreciating-unique-power-singular-appeal-lds-doctrine/ Tue, 18 Oct 2016 23:25:26 +0000 http://speeches-alpha.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=11264 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/brett-g-scharffs_audacious-faith-appreciating-unique-power-singular-appeal-lds-doctrine/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/brett-g-scharffs_audacious-faith-appreciating-unique-power-singular-appeal-lds-doctrine/feed/ 0 <p>As presented by an expert in international law and religion, LDS doctrine is characterized by unique and even audacious beliefs.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/brett-g-scharffs_audacious-faith-appreciating-unique-power-singular-appeal-lds-doctrine/">Audacious Faith: Appreciating the Unique Power and Singular Appeal of LDS Doctrine</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> Brett G. Scharffs, 18 October 2016 As presented by an expert in international law and religion, LDS doctrine is characterized by unique and even audacious beliefs. Charles Cranney clean 45:27 Orson Hyde, the Holy Land, and Brigham Young University—David M. Whitchurch, Oct 2016 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/david-m-whitchurch_orson-hyde-holy-land-byu/ Tue, 04 Oct 2016 23:20:54 +0000 https://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=11033 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/david-m-whitchurch_orson-hyde-holy-land-byu/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/david-m-whitchurch_orson-hyde-holy-land-byu/feed/ 0 <p>God's love for all his children is evident in this history of the BYU Jerusalem Center and LDS presence in the Holy Land.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/david-m-whitchurch_orson-hyde-holy-land-byu/">Orson Hyde, the Holy Land, and Brigham Young University</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> David M. Whitchurch, 4 October 2016 God's love for all his children is evident in this history of the BYU Jerusalem Center and LDS presence in the Holy Land. Christinah Mulder clean 36:43 Receiving the Eternal—David C. Dollahite, Sep 2016 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/david-c-dollahite_receiving-eternal/ Tue, 27 Sep 2016 16:37:25 +0000 https://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=10995 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/david-c-dollahite_receiving-eternal/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/david-c-dollahite_receiving-eternal/feed/ 0 <p>By sharing his spiritual journey and his experience with the Book of Mormon, David Dollahite teaches us all something about searching for the eternal.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/david-c-dollahite_receiving-eternal/">Receiving the Eternal</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> David C. Dollahite, 27 September 2016 By sharing his spiritual journey and his experience with the Book of Mormon, David Dollahite teaches us all something about searching for the eternal. David C. Dollahite clean 30:20 By sharing his spiritual journey and his experience with the Book of Mormon, David Dollahite teaches us all something about searching for the eternal. Elections, Hope, and Freedom—Dallin H. Oaks, Sep 2016 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/dallin-h-oaks_elections-hope-freedom/ Tue, 13 Sep 2016 17:39:55 +0000 https://speeches.byu.edu/?post_type=speech&p=10924 https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/dallin-h-oaks_elections-hope-freedom/#respond https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/dallin-h-oaks_elections-hope-freedom/feed/ 0 <p>In coming elections and at all times, we ought to communicate with kindness, maintain hope for the future, and defend religious freedom.</p> <p>The post <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu/talks/dallin-h-oaks_elections-hope-freedom/">Elections, Hope, and Freedom</a> appeared first on <a rel="nofollow" href="https://speeches.byu.edu">BYU Speeches</a>.</p> In coming elections and at all times, we ought to communicate with kindness, maintain hope for the future, and defend religious freedom. Dallin H. Oaks, 13 September 2016 Natalie clean 32:42 Dallin H. Oaks, 13 September 2016