• Last October I was assigned to speak in ­general conference. I decided to speak about perfecting our lives so that we could eventually become like our Father in Heaven. In my talk I invited the Saints to participate in a spiritual exercise. I suggested that members take the time to humbly ask the Lord the question “What lack I yet?” and then wait for a prompting from the Holy Ghost.
  • Graduates, families, brothers, sisters, faculty, staff, and friends—as you know, we have gathered to celebrate the accomplishments of those concluding this phase of their academic quests and to honor them for their achievements. In doing so, we also honor those of you who have played such key roles in the lives of those we identify for the special recognitions of the day. The names of the graduate
  • I have prayerfully prepared a message designed to bring you peace and happiness in a troubled world. I know that the truths it contains provide solutions because my precious wife, Jeanene, and I have proven their worth in our own lives. For you to obtain the maximum benefit from our time together, I suggest that you carefully write down any impressions that come to you. They are personalized me
  • Graduates, families, faculty, brothers, sisters, and friends: It is a signal privilege to welcome each of you to Brigham Young University’s commencement exercises. We are gathered to celebrate, to honor you, and to reflect on what has been accomplished and what is yet facing each of you as your circumstances change and your lives encounter needed adjustment. We, of course, sincerely congratulate a
  • Brothers and sisters, I am honored to be before you today in this devotional setting. I never imagined, as a BYU student in 1968, that in my future I would ever have something important enough to say that several hundred students would show up to hear me—unless, of course, they were getting course credit and I was taking roll! I appreciate the confidence others have shown in me by asking me to spe
  • I am both grateful and humbled to be with you today. It is often the case in Church assignments that the one who is called to serve is not the most qualified; rather, those with a need for growth or insight are given the task. I have been greatly blessed by my preparations—blessed in more ways than I could begin to share in the time allotted. I pray that through the influence of the Holy Ghost you
  • I rejoice in the singular privilege of being on this remarkable Brigham Young University campus with each of you. This entire center is charged with an ennobling spirit that originates from your individual purity and righteousness. With great depth of feeling I express my love for each of you and my profound gratitude for who you are and what you will accomplish in your lifetime. During the pas
  • Today is a count-your-blessings day; a day to celebrate. And on a day like today, you have countless reasons: You’ve finally passed American Heritage; you’ve landed a job that pays more than the Cougareat; you’re finished with 8 a.m. classes; you can stop eating frozen burritos; you don’t have to trudge across the quad in two feet of snow; you don’t have to memorize every element of the periodic t
  • To the paralytic man lying helpless on a bed, Jesus proclaimed, “Be of good cheer” (Matthew 9:2). To the frightened Apostles battling the tempestuous sea, Jesus appeared on the water, declaring, “Be of good cheer” (Matthew 14:27). To Nephi the son of Nephi, who was subject to an arbitrary law threatening his life and the lives of other righteous Nephites if the signs prophesied by Samuel the Laman
  • My soul delighteth in the things of the Lord,” wrote Nephi, “and my heart pondereth continually upon the things which I have seen and heard” (2 Nephi 4:16). Yet in the verses that follow, he expressed sorrow and even grief because of his weaknesses. Sometimes known as Nephi’s Psalm, these twenty powerful verses in 2 Nephi chapter 4 give us unique insights into the process he went through to lift h
  • The title of my remarks is “Happily Ever After.” If you don’t remember anything else that I say, please remember the following three points: 1. “Happily every after” does NOT happen without continuing effort. 2. We should not get discouraged when our careful plans and solutions don’t always lead to calm, clear sailing. 3. Don’t assume that the lives of those around you are cloudless and s
  • Elder Bateman: We welcome you to the first, official devotional of the 2001–2002 school year. We welcome a television audience that stretches across the United States and around the earth via satellite. One week ago Sister Bateman and I were prepared to address this same forum when tragedy struck New York City and the Pentagon. The events of that day have had an impact not only on the Unite
  • It seems most appropriate that we should not pass this day without recognizing the remarkable gift given to us some 56 years ago today. It was on that day that Allied forces, some 175,000 strong, fought their way ashore in Normandy to begin the final phase of the worst worldwide conflict in recorded history. That generation of young men, living and born during the Great Depression, gave of themsel
  • My beloved brothers and sisters, to be on this campus and in your presence is always a joy. I must confess, however, that I feel overwhelmed at the prospect of addressing so many of you and saying something that justifies taking you away from your studies. I do not have the answer to all of life’s questions. I don’t even know all the questions! I feel a bit like the college professor who asked
  • Through repeated prayers offered in preparation of this message, I have had one objective: that I be led to communicate truths that would significantly help each of you find happiness. I recognize that the great majority I address are faithful sons and daughters of Father in Heaven who strive to obey his commandments—or sincere individuals who want to do so. For that reason I would speak to each o
  • I pray that the Holy Ghost will help us receive what we need this morning—that both your prayers and mine will be answered. I want to begin by sharing a little story I first read many years ago: Two little children were put early to bed on a winter’s night, for the fire had gone out, and the cold was pouring in at the many cracks of their frail shanty. The mother stro
  • Good morning, my beloved young brothers and sisters. Thank you for inviting me to be here with you today. Nothing reminds me so forcefully of my advancing years as facing an audience of vibrant and wholesome young people like you. For years I gave little credence to the so-called generation gap, but now I’m willing to at least allow that such a social phenomenon exists. Periodic personal encoun
  • Greetings to all! What a great blessing to me personally to be here, to share a few thoughts with you, and to express my testimony of the Lord Jesus Christ. I have so many blessings—all too many to enumerate here. My family, as with most of you, is at the top of my list. Another great blessing, which we take for granted all too often, is this outstanding school of higher education. This is a bl
  • Janet: Several months ago while Rex and I were attending a BYU regional conference, we sat on the stand overlooking a sea of students. My mind whirled back over the years, remembering treasured moments from my own BYU experiences. I recalled having heart-to-heart talks with my roommates, walking through gently falling snow on the way home from the library, and reading or getting ready to go
  • Enjoy It

    Find a Way to Enjoy It I have borrowed for my remarks this evening somewhat from one of my wife’s talks given recently, and I hope that I can do justice to it. The story that I refer to begins when I was appointed to be the mission president in Brazil. As we presented this assignment to our children, our nine-year-old daughter was desolated with the thought that she would have to
  • I am honored to be here, but I must confess that it does not get any easier. I hope that all of you will remember as you attend Brigham Young University that your parents have been undergoing a very liberal education in how to be parents. I hope too that as you gain greater knowledge you gain some compassion for the process of that liberal education which they have been experiencing. Not too lo
  • Good morning. I think I am glad to be here. I have been thinking a lot about this assignment. Last week, after Bishop Clarke was here, I asked him how he got along and how he felt about what went on. He said, “Well, they gave me every chance to be a success, and if I wasn’t, it wasn’t their fault.” My favorite people are, of course, women because I have five daughters and no sons. And then to have
  • My brothers and sisters, it is a real privilege to be here at BYU and have this choice opportunity to share with you for a few moments some of my feelings. I appreciate Sister Gardner singing something so appropriate and with such a theme as “Trust in the Lord.” I suppose if there was one message I had for you today, that would be a good one—to trust, in all things, in the Lord. I am thankful,
  • It is good to be here with you this morning, my dear young friends. I ask that the Lord will help me to say something that will help you. Recently I spent the better part of a week in Washington, D.C., living in a hotel room. Each morning I watched the early news on television and then read the morning paper while eating breakfast. President Ford had just granted a pardon to his predecessor. Th
  • My beloved brothers and sisters, it’s a great thrill to be here and to see you all and to have heard these lovely musical numbers. I remember some years ago traveling along a street where there was a church. In front of the church was advertised what would take place the coming Sunday, and the sign on this particular day said, “What hell is like”; then written below was “Come and hear our choir.”
  • President Harvey L. Taylor, faculty, and ­students—all of you being my brothers and sisters—I am grateful for the privilege of standing today in this great fieldhouse at your devotional assembly. I bring you nothing startling. I merely came to chat with the students for a little while this morning during this devotional hour. The Time for Decision You are living in a wonderful ag
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